stifle


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sti·fle 1

 (stī′fəl)
tr.v. sti·fled, sti·fling, sti·fles
1. To interrupt or cut off (the voice, for example).
2. To keep in or hold back; repress: stifled my indignation.
3. To kill by preventing respiration; smother or suffocate.

[Middle English stifilen, alteration (influenced by Old Norse stīfla, to stop up) of stuffen, stuflen, to stifle, choke, drown, from Old French estoufer, of Germanic origin.]

sti′fler n.

sti·fle 2

 (stī′fəl)
n.
The joint of the hind leg analogous to the human knee in certain quadrupeds, such as the horse.

[Middle English, possibly from Old French estivel, pipe, leg, tibia, from Latin stīpes, stick.]

stifle

(ˈstaɪfəl)
vb
1. (tr) to smother or suppress: stifle a cough.
2. to feel or cause to feel discomfort and difficulty in breathing
3. to prevent or be prevented from breathing so as to cause death
4. (tr) to crush or stamp out
[C14: variant of stuflen, probably from Old French estouffer to smother]
ˈstifler n

stifle

(ˈstaɪfəl)
n
(Zoology) the joint in the hind leg of a horse, dog, etc, between the femur and tibia
[C14: of unknown origin]

sti•fle1

(ˈstaɪ fəl)

v. -fled, -fling. v.t.
1. to quell, crush, or end by force.
2. to suppress, curb, or withhold: to stifle a yawn.
3. to kill by impeding respiration; smother.
v.i.
4. to suffer from difficulty in breathing, as in a close atmosphere.
5. to become stifled or suffocated.
[1350–1400; < Old Norse stīfla, akin to stīfr stiff]
sti′fler, n.

sti•fle2

(ˈstaɪ fəl)

n.
(in a horse or other quadruped) the joint between the femur and the tibia, corresponding to the human knee. Also called sti′fle joint`..
[1275–1325; Middle English, of uncertain orig.]

stifle


Past participle: stifled
Gerund: stifling

Imperative
stifle
stifle
Present
I stifle
you stifle
he/she/it stifles
we stifle
you stifle
they stifle
Preterite
I stifled
you stifled
he/she/it stifled
we stifled
you stifled
they stifled
Present Continuous
I am stifling
you are stifling
he/she/it is stifling
we are stifling
you are stifling
they are stifling
Present Perfect
I have stifled
you have stifled
he/she/it has stifled
we have stifled
you have stifled
they have stifled
Past Continuous
I was stifling
you were stifling
he/she/it was stifling
we were stifling
you were stifling
they were stifling
Past Perfect
I had stifled
you had stifled
he/she/it had stifled
we had stifled
you had stifled
they had stifled
Future
I will stifle
you will stifle
he/she/it will stifle
we will stifle
you will stifle
they will stifle
Future Perfect
I will have stifled
you will have stifled
he/she/it will have stifled
we will have stifled
you will have stifled
they will have stifled
Future Continuous
I will be stifling
you will be stifling
he/she/it will be stifling
we will be stifling
you will be stifling
they will be stifling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been stifling
you have been stifling
he/she/it has been stifling
we have been stifling
you have been stifling
they have been stifling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been stifling
you will have been stifling
he/she/it will have been stifling
we will have been stifling
you will have been stifling
they will have been stifling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been stifling
you had been stifling
he/she/it had been stifling
we had been stifling
you had been stifling
they had been stifling
Conditional
I would stifle
you would stifle
he/she/it would stifle
we would stifle
you would stifle
they would stifle
Past Conditional
I would have stifled
you would have stifled
he/she/it would have stifled
we would have stifled
you would have stifled
they would have stifled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stifle - joint between the femur and tibia in a quadrupedstifle - joint between the femur and tibia in a quadruped; corresponds to the human knee
hind leg - the back limb of a quadruped
articulatio, joint, articulation - (anatomy) the point of connection between two bones or elements of a skeleton (especially if it allows motion)
Verb1.stifle - conceal or hide; "smother a yawn"; "muffle one's anger"; "strangle a yawn"
conquer, inhibit, stamp down, suppress, subdue, curb - to put down by force or authority; "suppress a nascent uprising"; "stamp down on littering"; "conquer one's desires"
2.stifle - smother or suppress; "Stifle your curiosity"
suffocate, choke - suppress the development, creativity, or imagination of; "His job suffocated him"
conquer, inhibit, stamp down, suppress, subdue, curb - to put down by force or authority; "suppress a nascent uprising"; "stamp down on littering"; "conquer one's desires"
stimulate, excite - act as a stimulant; "The book stimulated her imagination"; "This play stimulates"
3.stifle - impair the respiration of or obstruct the air passage ofstifle - impair the respiration of or obstruct the air passage of; "The foul air was slowly suffocating the children"
obturate, occlude, close up, impede, obstruct, jam, block - block passage through; "obstruct the path"
4.stifle - be asphyxiatedstifle - be asphyxiated; die from lack of oxygen; "The child suffocated under the pillow"
croak, decease, die, drop dead, buy the farm, cash in one's chips, give-up the ghost, kick the bucket, pass away, perish, snuff it, pop off, expire, conk, exit, choke, go, pass - pass from physical life and lose all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life; "She died from cancer"; "The children perished in the fire"; "The patient went peacefully"; "The old guy kicked the bucket at the age of 102"
strangle - die from strangulation
asphyxiate, suffocate, smother - deprive of oxygen and prevent from breathing; "Othello smothered Desdemona with a pillow"; "The child suffocated herself with a plastic bag that the parents had left on the floor"

stifle

verb
1. suppress, repress, prevent, stop, check, silence, curb, restrain, cover up, gag, hush, smother, extinguish, muffle, choke back Critics have accused them of trying to stifle debate.
2. restrain, suppress, repress, smother She makes no attempt to stifle a yawn.

stifle

verb
1. To hold (something requiring an outlet) in check:
Informal: sit on (or upon).
2. To decrease or dull the sound of:
3. To keep from being published or transmitted:
4. To stop the breathing of:
Translations
يُخْمِد الناريَخْنُق، يُخْمِديَكْبِت
dusitpotlačitudusit
kvæleundertrykke
bæla, halda aftur afkæfa, slökkvakæfa; kafna
apspiestnodzēstnoslāpētnosmacētnosmakt
udusiť

stifle

[ˈstaɪfl]
A. VT
1. [+ person] → ahogar, sofocar
2. (fig) → suprimir
to stifle a yawncontener un bostezo
to stifle oppositionreprimir a la oposición
B. VIahogarse, sofocarse

stifle

[ˈstaɪfəl] vt
(= suppress) [+ yawn, laugh] → étouffer
(= repress) [+ creativity, debate] → étouffer
(= suffocate) → étouffer

stifle

vt (= suffocate)ersticken; (fig) laugh, cough also, rage, oppositionunterdrücken; the heat nearly stifled themsie sind fast umgekommen vor Hitze
viersticken

stifle

[ˈstaɪfl]
1. vt (yawn, sob, anger) → soffocare; (desire, smile) → reprimere; (revolt, opposition) → stroncare
2. visoffocare

stifle

(ˈstaifl) verb
1. to prevent, or be prevented, from breathing (easily) eg because of bad air, an obstruction over the mouth and nose etc; to suffocate. He was stifled to death when smoke filled his bedroom; I'm stifling in this heat!
2. to extinguish or put out (flames).
3. to suppress (a yawn, a laugh etc).
ˈstifling adjective
very hot, stuffy etc. stifling heat; It's stifling in here.
References in classic literature ?
And so, just as before, only by occupation in the day, by morphine at night, could she stifle the fearful thought of what would be if he ceased to love her.
Like it to stifle one's sun, and one's inflexible solar will: verily, this art and this winter-roguishness have I learnt WELL!
Nor can piety itself, at such a shameful sight, completely stifle her upbraidings against the permitting stars.
His case featured in the British Medical Journal as a warning not to pinch the nose and keep the mouth shut to stifle a sneeze.
Surgical management was elected, and the stifle joint was approached via a lateral parapatellar incision.
Global Banking News-April 20, 2016--India's Banks Board Bureau chief says NPA levels should not stifle lending
It was revealed that Shared Belief, beaten just once in 11 previous starts, had sustained a hind-leg stifle injury during the race, in which he stumbled at the break and then raced at the back of a nine-runner field.
EU Commissioner in charge of competition policy Margrethe Vestager said: "The Commission's objective is to apply EU antitrust rules to ensure that companies operating in Europe, wherever they may be based, do not artificially deny European consumers as wide a choice as possible or stifle innovation".
This indicates that some still wish to stifle the farmers voice.
Summary: Bryan Peterson, photographer and author, doesn't like to stifle creativity.
MISA Namibia has called for the withdrawal of the Research, Science and Technology Act as it has the potential to stifle freedom of expression, particularly the undertaking of independent research.