stigmatic


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Related to stigmatic: Stigmatic Image

stig·mat·ic

 (stĭg-măt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Relating to, resembling, or having stigmata or a stigma.
2. Anastigmatic.
n.
A person marked with religious stigmata.

stig·mat′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stigmatic

(stɪɡˈmætɪk) or

stigmatical

adj
1. relating to or having a stigma or stigmata
2. (General Physics) another word for anastigmatic
n
(Theology) chiefly RC Church a person marked with the stigmata
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

stig•mat•ic

(stɪgˈmæt ɪk)

adj. Also, stig•mat′i•cal.
1. pertaining to a stigma, mark, spot, or the like.
n.
3. Also, stig•ma•tist (ˈstɪg mə tɪst) a person marked with supernatural stigmata.
[1585–95; < Medieval Latin stigmaticus]
stig•mat′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stigmatic - a person whose body is marked by religious stigmata (such as marks resembling the wounds of the crucified Christ)
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Adj.1.stigmatic - pertaining to or resembling or having stigmata
2.stigmatic - pertaining to a lens or lens system free of astigmatism (able to form point images)stigmatic - pertaining to a lens or lens system free of astigmatism (able to form point images)
3.stigmatic - not astigmaticstigmatic - not astigmatic      
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

stigmatic

[stɪgˈmætɪk] (Rel)
A. ADJestigmatizado
B. Nestigmatizado/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
On the other hand, I have found by experiment that the fertility of clover greatly depends on bees visiting and moving parts of the corolla, so as to push the pollen on to the stigmatic surface.
To be stigmatic, discrimination must be paired with the idea of social unfitness.
Above all else, the book is a clarion call to "humanize" the data in the public discourse about Black students in order to remove the stigmatic effect of negative reports, which Toldson says can lead educators--and Black students themselves--to expect failure instead of searching for their strengths.
I use the words 'person-centredness' as opposed to 'patient-centredness' deliberately, the term 'person' denotes a "holistic humanness and the equal value of individuals", whereas 'patient' has been described as a "reductionist, stigmatic term that imputes imperfections or undesired differentness to a person and thereby reduces the humanity of the subject" (Kitwood, 1997; Edvardsson et al., 2008, p363).
Character Saissetia miranda Saissetia oleae Ventral tubular ducts One type with slender One type with slender filament filament Dorsal setae Conical and conspicuous Spiniform Tibio-tarsal sclerose Present Usually present (*) Marginal setae Long and fimbriate in -- the apex Number of marginal setae between anterior stigmatic clefts Between 40 and 60 Two Between 14 and 24 sizes Number of marginal setae between anterior and posterior stigmatic clefts.
People become less likely to share sensitive information and show a decreased willingness to seek care, particularly in cases of stigmatic illness and injury.
I have encountered this problem myself and that was 17 years ago That was apart from the rudeness of a small minority of stigmatic job centre staff.
The group draws upon the Title IX law as an alternative to the criminal legal system--one that is more just and responsive to the educational, emotional, financial, and stigmatic harms of violence.