stile


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Related to stile: style

stile 1

 (stīl)
n.
1. A set or series of steps for crossing a fence or wall, usually constructed so as to allow humans but not livestock to pass.
2. A turnstile.

[Middle English, from Old English stigel; see steigh- in Indo-European roots.]

stile 2

 (stīl)
n.
A vertical member of a panel or frame, as in a door or window sash.

[Probably from Dutch stijl, doorpost, from Middle Dutch, possibly from Latin stilus, pole, post.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stile

(staɪl)
n
1. (Agriculture) a set of steps or rungs in a wall or fence to allow people, but not animals, to pass over
2. (Building) short for turnstile
[Old English stigel; related to stīgan to climb, Old High German stigilla; see stair]

stile

(staɪl)
n
(Building) a vertical framing member in a door, window frame, or piece of panelling. Compare rail13
[C17: probably from Dutch stijl pillar, ultimately from Latin stilus writing instrument; see style]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

stile1

(staɪl)

n.
1. a step or steps for scaling a wall or fence.
2. a turnstile.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English stigel (c. Old High German stigilla), derivative of stīgan to climb]

stile2

(staɪl)

n.
any of various vertical members framing panels or the like, as in a paneled door or a window sash. Compare rail 1 (def. 8).
[1670–80; perhaps < Dutch stijl (door-, bed-) post, strut]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stile - an upright that is a member in a door or window framestile - an upright that is a member in a door or window frame
upright, vertical - a vertical structural member as a post or stake; "the ball sailed between the uprights"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مَطْلَع دَرَجي
schůdky přes ohradu
stente
jalkaporraspieli
lépcsõs átjáró
stigi yfir girîingu
perlipa
schody

stile

[staɪl] Nescalones mpl para saltar una cerca
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

stile

[ˈstaɪl] néchalier m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

stile

n(Zaun)übertritt m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

stile

[staɪl] nscaletta (per scavalcare una siepe)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

stile

(stail) noun
a step, or set of steps, for climbing over a wall or fence.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Cock Robin looked sideways at Lucie with his bright black eye, and he flew over a stile and away.
He insisted upon leaping the stile, and said he could cut a pigeon-wing over it in the air.
This lane inclined up-hill all the way to Hay; having reached the middle, I sat down on a stile which led thence into a field.
I dogged 'em to the widder's stile, and stood in the dark and heard the ragged one beg for the widder, and the Spaniard swear he'd spile her looks just as I told you and your two --"
She thought she could walk back across the field, and get over the stile; and then, in the very next field, she thought she remembered there was a hovel of furze near a sheepfold.
I went down to the front garden and clumb over the stile where you go through the high board fence.
Then he started for the stile, and as he went over it the moon came out strong, and he had a long-handled shovel over his shoulder, and we see the white patch on the old work-gown.
So, talking to himself, he came to where the dusty road turned sharply around the hedge, all tender with the green of the coming leaf, and there he saw before him a stout fellow sitting upon a stile, swinging his legs in idleness.
The brow of the hill, where they remained, was a cheerful spot: Louisa returned; and Mary, finding a comfortable seat for herself on the step of a stile, was very well satisfied so long as the others all stood about her; but when Louisa drew Captain Wentworth away, to try for a gleaning of nuts in an adjoining hedge-row, and they were gone by degrees quite out of sight and sound, Mary was happy no longer; she quarrelled with her own seat, was sure Louisa had got a much better somewhere, and nothing could prevent her from going to look for a better also.
I have a little to do here at this stile." The man turned as he spoke to an opening at the roadside leading into a pasture.
I descended at once to the churchyard, and crossed the stile which led directly to Mrs.
There was a stile to pass from this field into the next.