stillbirth


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Related to stillbirth: miscarriage

still·birth

 (stĭl′bûrth′)
n.
1. The birth of a dead infant.
2. An infant who is dead at birth.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stillbirth

(ˈstɪlˌbɜːθ)
n
1. (Pathology) birth of a dead fetus or baby
2. (Pathology) a stillborn fetus or baby
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

still•birth

(ˈstɪlˌbɜrθ)

n.
1. the birth of a dead child or animal.
2. a fetus dead at birth.
[1745–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stillbirth - a natural loss of the products of conceptionstillbirth - a natural loss of the products of conception
abortion - termination of pregnancy
habitual abortion - repeated spontaneous abortion (often for no known reason)
imminent abortion, threatened abortion - the appearance of symptoms that signal the impending loss of the products of conception
incomplete abortion, partial abortion - termination of pregnancy without expulsion of all of the products of conception
live birth - the birth of a living fetus (regardless of the length of gestation)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

stillbirth

[ˈstɪlˌbɜːθ] Nmortinato m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

stillbirth

[ˈstɪlbɜːrθ] nmortinaissance f, naissance f d'un enfant mort-né
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

stillbirth

[ˈstɪlˌbɜːθ] nbambino/a nato/a morto/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

still·birth

n. nacimiento sin vida.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

stillbirth

n mortinato, parto de un feto muerto después de 28 semanas de embarazo
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Higher maternal hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are associated with increased risk for stillbirth among women with type 1 diabetes, while higher BMI increases risk for women with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online July 29 in Diabetologia.
Pregnancy is associated with several complications and (https://cms.ibtimes.com/risk-stillbirths-newborn-deaths-rise-every-week-after-full-term-pregnancy-2808914) stillbirth is a nightmare for every expecting mother.
[USA], Aug 2 (ANI): A recent study found that the currently recommended treatment for a common pregnancy liver disorder that can result in preterm birth and stillbirth is ineffective and should be reconsidered.
The loss of a baby due to stillbirth remains a sad ending of a pregnancy.
The longer a pregnancy continues after reaching fullterm, the higher the risk of stillbirth, a study has found.
TUESDAY, July 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The longer a pregnancy continues past term, the higher the risk of stillbirth, according to a new study that analyzed 15 million pregnancies.
Fetuses that are small for gestational age (SGA) are at increased risk of stillbirth. SGA fetuses that are not detected during the antepartum period are at a four-fold increased risk of serious fetal complications compared with SGA fetuses detected before delivery.
The dangers of smoking in pregnancy are well-known: stillbirth, heart defects and low birth weight.
New research carried out by Aberdeen scientists has found women are no more likely to have a stillbirth just because their mother may have had one.
A STUDY by Aberdeen University has found that women are no more likely to have a stillbirth just because their mother may have had one.
SLEEPING on your back while pregnant can increase the risk of stillbirth by almost three times, a Huddersfield researcher has discovered.