stimulus

(redirected from stimuli)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

stim·u·lus

 (stĭm′yə-ləs)
n. pl. stim·u·li (-lī′)
1. Something causing or regarded as causing a response.
2. An agent, action, or condition that elicits or accelerates a physiological or psychological activity or response.
3.
a. Something that incites or rouses to action; an incentive: "Works which were in themselves poor have often proved a stimulus to the imagination" (W.H. Auden).
b. Government spending designed to generate or increase economic activity.

[Latin, goad.]

stimulus

(ˈstɪmjʊləs)
n, pl -li (-ˌlaɪ; -ˌliː)
1. something that stimulates or acts as an incentive
2. (Physiology) any drug, agent, electrical impulse, or other factor able to cause a response in an organism
3. (Psychology) an object or event that is apprehended by the senses
4. (Pharmacology) med a former name for stimulant
[C17: from Latin: a cattle goad]

stim•u•lus

(ˈstɪm yə ləs)

n., pl. -li (-ˌlaɪ)
1. something that incites or quickens action, feeling, thought, etc.
2. something that excites an organism or part to functional activity.
[1605–15; < Latin: a goad, stimulus]

stim·u·lus

(stĭm′yə-ləs)
Plural stimuli (stĭm′yə-lī′)
Something that causes a response in a body part or organism. A stimulus may be internal or external. Sense organs, such as the ear, and sensory receptors, such as those in the skin, are sensitive to external stimuli such as sound and touch.

stimulus

Any change that evokes a response from an organism.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stimulus - any stimulating information or eventstimulus - any stimulating information or event; acts to arouse action
information - knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction
elicitation, evocation, induction - stimulation that calls up (draws forth) a particular class of behaviors; "the elicitation of his testimony was not easy"
kick - the sudden stimulation provided by strong drink (or certain drugs); "a sidecar is a smooth drink but it has a powerful kick"
turn-on - something causing excitement or stimulating interest
negative stimulation, turnoff - something causing antagonism or loss of interest
conditioned stimulus - the stimulus that is the occasion for a conditioned response
reinforcer, reinforcing stimulus, reinforcement - (psychology) a stimulus that strengthens or weakens the behavior that produced it
discriminative stimulus, cue - a stimulus that provides information about what to do
positive stimulus - a stimulus with desirable consequences
negative stimulus - a stimulus with undesirable consequences

stimulus

noun incentive, spur, encouragement, impetus, provocation, inducement, goad, incitement, fillip, shot in the arm (informal), clarion call, geeing-up Falling interest rates could be a stimulus to the economy.

stimulus

noun
1. Something that causes and encourages a given response:
2. Something that incites especially a violent response:
Translations
باعِث، دافِعمُثير، حافِز
hnací sílapodnět
motivationstimulus
inger
áreiti, ertingörvun, hvatning; drifkraftur
pamudinājumsstimuls
hnacia sila

stimulus

[ˈstɪmjʊləs] N (stimuli (pl)) [ˈstɪmjʊlaɪ]estímulo m, incentivo m

stimulus

[ˈstɪmjʊləs] [stimuli] [ˈstɪmjʊlaɪ] (pl) n
(= encouragement) → stimulant m
(PSYCHOLOGY, PSYCHIATRY)stimulus m
(BIOLOGY)stimulus m

stimulus

n pl <stimuli> → Anreiz m, → Ansporn m; (= inspiration)Anregung f, → Stimulus m; (Physiol) → Reiz m; (Psych) → Stimulus m; it gave the trade new stimulusdas hat dem Handel neuen Aufschwung gegeben

stimulus

[ˈstɪmjʊləs] n (stimuli (pl)) [ˈstɪmjʊlaɪ]stimolo
it gave trade a new stimulus → ha dato un nuovo impulso al commercio
under the stimulus of → stimolato/a da

stimulus

(ˈstimjuləs) plural ˈstimuli (-liː) noun
1. something that causes a reaction in a living thing. Light is the stimulus that causes a flower to open.
2. something that rouses or encourages a person etc to action or greater effort. Many people think that children need the stimulus of competition to make them work better in school.

stim·u·lus

n. estímulo, cualquier agente o factor que produce una reacción;
conditioned ______ condicionado;
subliminal ______ sublimado.

stimulus

n (pl -li) estímulo
References in periodicals archive ?
A matching-to-sample (MTS) training paradigm is often conducted to establish the relations between stimuli. During MTS, a sample stimulus and two or more comparison stimuli are presented, and the participants' task is to match stimuli in experimenter-defined classes based on consequences of responding (Sidman & Tailby, 1982).
Studies involving arbitrary conditional discriminations describe exclusion responding as the immediate selection of a novel comparison stimulus (i.e., without a previously defined discriminative function) in the presence of a novel sample stimulus, when the novel comparison stimulus is presented among familiar comparison stimuli (i.e., with defined discriminative functions in relation to other sample stimuli).
So far, the premier expression has only been observed in response to surprise stimuli. Thus, it would be important to determine whether it occurs for other emotions in order to confirm its generality and features as the first output of emotion.
Similar time exploring both objects would indicate an inability to recognize the familiar stimuli whilst a preference for the novel stimulus over the familiar one would imply familiar stimulus recognition.
Stimuli maybe applied either at a single cranial site or systematically over a predefined grid, in a process known as "mapping" [4].
When different exteroceptive stimuli are added to each one of these subcycles, the first response in [t.sup.D] subcycle produces the delivery of the reinforcer and turns off the exteroceptive stimulus, while in [t.sup.[DELTA] the stimulus remains on independently of emitted responses.
The stimuli involved in music reading are compounds that include several properties that are simultaneously presented (e.g., length, interval, loudness) so that the musician must respond differently to each of them.
Weber warned that central banks in Europe and Japan have reached the limits of monetary stimulus and more stimuli would not be sustainable.
A red traffic light, a road sign, or an officer's signal are examples of environmental stimuli that influence the probability that a driver stops a vehicle.
a You can do that by decreasing distance to X minus Y; by increasing movement of the stimulus at distance X (a child walking, skipping, or swinging her arms); by increasing number of stimuli (two or three children, instead of one); increasing the visual "threat" (a tall man instead of a short one, or a man with a beard instead of a clean-shaven one); or by increasing volume (if it's a stimulus that makes noise, such as a vacuum cleaner).
The ability of educators to identify reinforcing stimuli that may function as powerful consequences determines the success of reinforcement-based strategies.