stirabout


Also found in: Wikipedia.
Related to stirabout: Rosicrucian

stirabout

(ˈstɜːrəˌbaʊt)
n
1. (Cookery) a kind of porridge originally made in Ireland
2. a bustling person
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Only demeaning "relief": a straw mattress on a plank bed; a diet of stirabout, potatoes, and milk; barred windows and padlocked gates.
cornmeal, peasemeal, etc.), or a porridge made from oats (also called oatmeal cereal or stirabout).
Stuck to his task well and, although the third Stirabout flopped in Clonmel on Thursday, should build on that comeback run.
Rose mentions one such woman who 'told her mistress, that she was not used to tea, and would not choose to be used to it, for it was a thing she could not have at home; and that stirabout, or bread and milk, was a better breakfast for her.
(23) It may have been possible in Dublin to separate religious and philanthropic activities; in Connemara, however, both mission and relief were administered by ICM personnel and distributed mainly through the schools, as was observed by a visitor to Fakeragh school: "On entering, we were much amused by the immense pot of Indianmeal stirabout [porridge] which was cooling near the door." (24)
One mother admitted that she did not know "what the Jumpers teach, but that religion can't be too bad that pities the famishing; so my children go to the Jumpers' school and get the stirabout." (32) The agents in Spiddal were "well received, but the people in the absence of a regularly endowed ministry, decline to allow them to read the Bible in their cottages." (33) Mrs.
The formidable adversaries were sixteen-year-old girls, who jeered at workhouse officials, and hurled heavy glass soda water bottles, platters, stones, and stirabout gruel at them, finally jumping the master.
There are many omissions of fairly common Irish-English usages: "delph" (crockery or false teeth), "stirabout" (porridge), "form" (a two-shilling piece), "slavey" (servant) and "dinge" (dent).