stirrup


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Related to stirrup: stirrup cup

stir·rup

 (stûr′əp, stĭr′-)
n.
1. A flat-based loop or ring hung from either side of a horse's saddle to support the rider's foot in mounting and riding; a stirrup iron.
2. A part or device shaped like an inverted U in which something is supported, held, or fixed.
3. A rope on a ship that hangs from a yard and has an eye at the end through which a footrope is passed for support.
4. See stapes.

[Middle English stirope, from Old English stīgrāp : stīgan, to mount; see steigh- in Indo-European roots + rāp, rope.]

stirrup

(ˈstɪrəp)
n
1. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) Also called: stirrup iron either of two metal loops on a riding saddle, with a flat footpiece through which a rider puts his foot for support. They are attached to the saddle by stirrup leathers
2. (Building) a U-shaped support or clamp made of metal, wood, leather, etc
3. (Nautical Terms) nautical one of a set of ropes fastened to a yard at one end and having a thimble at the other through which a footrope is rove for support
4. (Mountaineering) the usual US name for étrier
[Old English stigrāp, from stīg path, step (related to Old High German stīgan to move up) + rāp rope; related to Old Norse stigreip, Old High German stegareif]

stir•rup

(ˈstɜr əp, ˈstɪr-, ˈstʌr-)

n.
1. a loop, ring, or other contrivance suspended from the saddle of a horse to support the rider's foot.
2. any of various similar supports or clamps used for special purposes.
3. a short rope with an eye at the end hung from a yard to support a footrope.
4. (in reinforced-concrete constructions) a U-shaped or W-shaped bent rod for supporting longitudinal reinforcing rods.
5. stapes.
6.
a. a strap of fabric or elastic at the bottom of a pair of trousers, worn around and under the foot.
b. stirrups, (used with a pl. v.) close-fitting knit trousers with such straps.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English stigrāp (stige ascent + rāp rope), c. Old High German stegareif]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stirrup - support consisting of metal loops into which rider's feet gostirrup - support consisting of metal loops into which rider's feet go
saddle - a seat for the rider of a horse or camel
support - any device that bears the weight of another thing; "there was no place to attach supports for a shelf"
2.stirrup - the stirrup-shaped ossicle that transmits sound from the incus to the cochlea
auditory ossicle - ossicles of the middle ear that transmit acoustic vibrations from the eardrum to the inner ear
middle ear, tympanic cavity, tympanum - the main cavity of the ear; between the eardrum and the inner ear
Translations

stirrup

[ˈstɪrəp]
A. N (on saddle) → estribo m
B. CPD stirrup cup Ncopa f del estribo
stirrup pump Nbomba f de mano

stirrup

[ˈstɪrəp] nétrier m

stirrup

nSteigbügel m (also Anat)

stirrup

:
stirrup cup
nAbschiedstrunk m
stirrup pump
nHandspritze f

stirrup

[ˈstɪrəp] nstaffa

stirrup

n (anat, gyn, etc.) estribo
References in classic literature ?
Daylight superintended the preparations, adjusting the curb strap and the stirrup length, and doing the cinching.
He hurriedly but vainly tried to get his foot out of the stirrup and did not remove his frightened blue eyes from Rostov's face.
Old John, who had peeped from behind the red curtain as they rode up shouting for Hugh, was out directly, and said with great importance as he held the young man's stirrup,
And when I had told him he staggered as though he had been struck full in the face, so that he was compelled to grasp my stirrup leather for support.
One stirrup had gone, and he was riding with his leg quite stiff.
Sparsit netting at the fireside, in a side-saddle attitude, with one foot in a cotton stirrup.
Dance told me to jump down and knock, and Dogger gave me a stirrup to descend by.
Before the mare had time to move, Vronsky stepped with an agile, vigorous movement into the steel-toothed stirrup, and lightly and firmly seated himself on the creaking leather of the saddle.
Her lover was out of the saddle and clear of Comanche, though held to the animal by his right foot, which was caught in the stirrup.
And, think you, when he saw one of your feet out of the stirrup, he would wait for the other to be free?
uf, who lost a stirrup in the encounter, was adjudged to have the disadvantage.
As they made their way stirrup to stirrup across the plain the Hon.