stocker


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

stock

 (stŏk)
n.
1. A supply accumulated for future use; a store.
2. The total merchandise kept on hand by a merchant, commercial establishment, warehouse, or manufacturer.
3.
a. All the animals kept or raised on a farm; livestock.
b. All the aquatic animals kept or raised in an aquaculture operation.
c. A population of wild animals, especially of a species that is also farmed: interactions between hatchery fish and wild stocks.
4.
a. A kind of financial security granting rights of ownership in a corporation, such as a claim to a portion of the assets and earnings of the corporation and the right to vote for the board of directors. Stock is issued and traded in units called shares.
b. The stock issued by a particular company: a mutual fund that invests in technology stocks.
c. Chiefly British The money invested in a corporation, including debt and equity.
d. Chiefly British A bond, especially a government bond.
5. The trunk or main stem of a tree or another plant.
6.
a. A plant or stem onto which a graft is made.
b. A plant or tree from which cuttings and slips are taken.
7.
a. The original progenitor of a family line.
b. The descendants of a common ancestor; a family line, especially of a specified character: comes from farming stock.
c. Ancestry or lineage; antecedents.
d. The type from which a group of animals or plants has descended.
e. A race, family, or other related group of animals or plants.
f. An ethnic group or other major division of the human race.
g. A group of related languages.
h. A group of related families of languages.
8.
a. The raw material out of which something is made.
b. Paper used for printing.
9. The broth in which meat, fish, bones, or vegetables are simmered for a relatively long period, used as a base in preparing soup, gravy, or sauces.
10.
a. A main upright part, especially a supporting structure or block.
b. stocks Nautical The timber frame that supports a ship during construction.
c. often stocks A frame in which a horse or other animal is held for shoeing or for veterinary treatment.
11. stocks A device consisting of a heavy timber frame with holes for confining the ankles and sometimes the wrists, formerly used for punishment.
12. Nautical A crosspiece at the end of the shank of an anchor.
13. The wooden block from which a bell is suspended.
14.
a. The rear wooden, metal, or plastic handle or support of a rifle, pistol, or automatic weapon, to which the barrel and mechanism are attached.
b. The long supporting structure and mooring beam of field-gun carriages that trails along the ground to provide stability and support.
15. A handle, such as that of a whip, a fishing rod, or various carpentry tools.
16. The frame of a plow, to which the share, handles, coulter, and other parts are fastened.
17.
a. A theatrical stock company.
b. The repertoire of such a company.
c. A theater or theatrical activity, especially outside of a main theatrical center: a small role in summer stock.
18. Botany Any of several Eurasian and Mediterranean plants of the genus Matthiola in the mustard family, especially M. incana, widely cultivated for its clusters of showy, fragrant, variously colored flowers.
19. Games The portion of a pack of cards or of a group of dominoes that is not dealt out but is drawn from during a game.
20. Geology A body of intrusive igneous rock of which less than 100 square kilometers (40 square miles) is exposed.
21. Zoology A compound organism, such as a colony of zooids.
22.
a. Personal reputation or status: a teacher whose stock with the students is rising.
b. Confidence or credence: I put no stock in that statement.
23.
a. A long white neckcloth worn as part of a formal riding habit.
b. A broad scarf worn around the neck, especially by certain clerics.
24. Rolling stock.
v. stocked, stock·ing, stocks
v.tr.
1. To provide or furnish with a stock of something, especially:
a. To supply (a shop) with merchandise.
b. To supply (a farm) with livestock.
c. To fill (a stream, for example) with fish.
2. To keep for future sale or use.
3. To provide (a rifle, for example) with a stock.
4. Obsolete To put (someone) in the stocks as a punishment.
v.intr.
1. To gather and lay in a supply of something: stock up on canned goods.
2. To put forth or sprout new shoots. Used of a plant.
adj.
1. Kept regularly in stock: a stock item.
2. Repeated regularly without any thought or originality; routine: a stock answer.
3. Employed in dealing with or caring for stock or merchandise: a stock clerk.
4.
a. Of or relating to the raising of livestock: stock farming.
b. Used for breeding: a stock mare.
5.
a. Of or relating to a stock company or its repertoire.
b. Of or being a conventional character or situation that recurs in many literary or cinematic works.
Idioms:
in stock
Available for sale or use; on hand.
out of stock
Not available for sale or use.

[Middle English stok, from Old English stocc, tree trunk. N., sense 18, short for stock-gillyflower (from their woody stems ).]

stock′age n.
stock′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stocker - a domestic animal (especially a young steer or heifer) kept as stock until fattened or matured and suitable for a breeding establishment
domestic animal, domesticated animal - any of various animals that have been tamed and made fit for a human environment
Translations
vakioauto
References in classic literature ?
From the engine room companionway came the engineer and stockers, and together we leaped after the balance of the crew and into the hand-to-hand fight that was covering the wet deck with red blood.
It is the grave of Nanette Stocker - a showbiz giant despite measuring only 3ft 3ins tall.
Berlin: Hertha Berlin midfielder Valentin Stocker is sidelined indefinitely with a knee injury and defender Niklas Stark will miss at least three weeks with a calf muscle problem.
The action, brought by Ted Stocker, from Glan Conwy, established that only police had the right to charge drivers for the offence - but only if vehicles caused an obstruction to traffic.
CCTV footage showed victim Laura Fitzgerald mouthing "help me" after Warren Stocker, 32, dragged her from her home in Eastham, Wirral, leaving their three children alone in the house.
Andrew Stocker ordered Scott Cain, 23, and Ashley Clarke, 24, into a nitrogencooled apple store with an oxygen level of just 1% to pick the finest specimens.
Andrew Stocker, 57, of The Links, Whitehill, Bordon, Hampshire, was convicted at Winchester Crown Court over the deaths of two employees at the Blackmoor Estate in Liss, owned by Tory peer Lord Selborne, by ignoring health and safety regulations through encouraging staff to use the "dangerous" practice of "scuba-diving".
Andrew Stocker, 57, of Whitehill, Bordon, Hampshire, was convicted at Winchester Crown Court over the deaths at the Blackmoor Estate in Liss, by ignoring health and safety regulations through encouraging staff to use the "dangerous" procedure.
There was double delight, too, for former Coventry City vicechairman Ted Stocker before and after the match.
The Clean Stocker CLS-50 buffers intrabay and interbay work in progress with location modules that can be expanded as required.