stockjobber

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stock·job·ber

 (stŏk′jŏb′ər)
n.
1. Chiefly British A stock-exchange operator who deals only with brokers.
2. A stockbroker, especially an unscrupulous one.

stock′job′bing n.

stockjobber

(ˈstɒkˌdʒɒbə)
n
1. (Stock Exchange) Brit (formerly) a wholesale dealer on a stock exchange who sold securities to brokers without transacting directly with the public. Often shortened to: jobber See also market maker
2. (Stock Exchange) derogatory US a stockbroker, esp one dealing in worthless securities
ˈstockˌjobbery, ˈstockˌjobbing n

stock•job•ber

(ˈstɒkˌdʒɒb ər)

n.
a stockbroker, esp. one who sells worthless securities.
[1620–30]
stock′job`bing, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stockjobber - one who deals only with brokers or other jobbers
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
stock trader - someone who buys and sells stock shares
Translations

stockjobber

[ˈstɒkˌdʒɒbəʳ] N (Brit) → agiotista mf
References in periodicals archive ?
Early in the 20th century, for example, Charles Beard marshaled evidence purporting to show that, far from being disinterested patriots, the founders were a band of stockjobbers, moneylenders, and land speculators who wrote the Constitution to promote, not the general welfare, but their private fortunes.
In the old British aristocracy, before brewers, press barons, and stockjobbers were ennobled so long as they were friends of the government, status was passed down from generation to generation by families who claimed to have served their country in war and peace.
31) But underlying these legal arguments was a deeper ideological opposition to high finance, associated with large Northeastern cities--in the opposition's bitter phrases, "speculators & Tories" (32) or stockjobbers.