stoicism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to stoicism: epicureanism

sto·i·cism

 (stō′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. Indifference to pleasure or pain; impassiveness.
2. Stoicism The doctrines or philosophy of the Stoics.

stoicism

(ˈstəʊɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. indifference to pleasure and pain
2. (Philosophy) (capital) the philosophy of the Stoics

Sto•i•cism

(ˈstoʊ əˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. the philosophy of the Stoics.
2. (l.c.) conduct conforming to the precepts of the Stoics, as repression of emotion and indifference to pleasure or pain.
[1620–30]

stoicism

a form of conduct conforming to the precepts of the Stoics, especially as characterized by indifference to pain and pleasure. — stoic, n., adj.stoical, adj.
See also: Pleasure
an indifference to pleasure or pain. — stoic, n., adj. — stoical, adj.
See also: Pain
the school of philosophy founded by Zeno (of Citium), who asserted that men should be free from passion, unmoved by joy or grief, and submit without complaint to unavoidable necessity. — Stoic, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy

stoicism

A Greek philosophy adopted by Rome stressing private rectitude and involvement in public affairs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stoicism - an indifference to pleasure or pain
emotionlessness, unemotionality - absence of emotion
2.Stoicism - (philosophy) the philosophical system of the Stoics following the teachings of the ancient Greek philosopher Zeno
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy

stoicism

Translations

stoicism

[ˈstəʊɪsɪzəm] Nestoicismo m

stoicism

[ˈstəʊɪsɪzəm] nstoïcisme m

Stoicism

n (Philos) → Stoizismus m

stoicism

n (fig)Stoizismus m, → stoische Ruhe, Gleichmut m

stoicism

[ˈstəʊɪsɪz] nstoicismo
References in classic literature ?
If they could not teach the white men their practical stoicism, they at least made them acquainted with the edible properties of roots and wild rosebuds, and furnished them a supply from their own store.
Strickland would not go near them, not from any affectation of stoicism, for I found him seated on a three-legged stool when I went into the studio one day and he was alone, but because he did not like them.
Indeed this gentleman's stoicism was of that not uncommon kind, which enables a man to bear with exemplary fortitude the afflictions of his friends, but renders him, by way of counterpoise, rather selfish and sensitive in respect of any that happen to befall himself.
The travel-stained adventurers gazed after her in astonishment, and even the unemotional Indians, journeying in with their pelties, relaxed their accustomed stoicism as they marvelled at the beauty of the pale-faced maiden.
" Stoicism! That's a pose of the Greeks and the Romans.
Although in a state of perfect repose, and apparently disregarding, with characteristic stoicism, the excitement and bustle around him, there was a sullen fierceness mingled with the quiet of the savage, that was likely to arrest the attention of much more experienced eyes than those which now scanned him, in unconcealed amazement.
The Saxon had been under very intense and agonizing apprehensions concerning his son; for Nature had asserted her rights, in spite of the patriotic stoicism which laboured to disown her.
The stoicism of the warriors was at an end; they became wild and desperate; some set fire to the village as a last means of checking the pestilence; others, in a frenzy of despair, put their wives and children to death, that they might be spared the agonies of an inevitable disease, and that they might all go to some better country.
He was prepared to take whatever his former comrades had to offer in the way of insults and reproaches, and take them in manly silence and stoicism.
Sometimes you saw an untaught stoicism which was profoundly moving.
A jungle beast was Tarzan with the stoicism of the beast and the intelligence of man.
In spite of his Christian stoicism, when she went up and addressed him, and smiled gaily, encouragingly, even fondly in his face, his hand would tremble and his eye burn.