dilatation

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Related to stomach dilatation: heart dilatation

dil·a·ta·tion

 (dĭl′ə-tā′shən, dī′lə-)
n.
Dilation.

dil′a·ta′tion·al adj.

dil•a•ta•tion

(ˌdɪl əˈteɪ ʃən, ˌdaɪ lə-)

also dilation



n.
1. a dilated formation or part.
2. an abnormal enlargement of an organ, aperture, or canal of the body.
3.
a. an enlargement made in a body aperture or canal for surgical or medical treatment.
b. a restoration to normal patency of an abnormally small body opening or passageway.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Old French) < Latin]
dil`a•ta′tion•al, adj.

dilatation

The expanding or enlarging of a part of the body. See D C.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dilatation - the state of being stretched beyond normal dimensions
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
tympanites - distension of the abdomen that is caused by the accumulation of gas in the intestines or the peritoneal cavity
ectasia, ectasis - dilatation or distension of a hollow organ
varicocele - dilatation of the veins associated with the spermatic cord in the testes
2.dilatation - the act of expanding an aperture; "the dilation of the pupil of the eye"
enlargement, expansion - the act of increasing (something) in size or volume or quantity or scope
vasodilation - dilation of blood vessels (especially the arteries)
mydriasis - reflex pupillary dilation as a muscle pulls the iris outward; occurs in response to a decrease in light or certain drugs
Translations

dilatation

, dilation
nAusdehnung f, → Erweiterung f; (of pupils)Erweiterung f; dilatation and curettageDilation und Kürettage f (spec), → Ausschabung f

dil·a·ta·tion

n. dilatación, aumento o expansión anormal de un órgano u orificio.
References in periodicals archive ?
CT findings suggestive of gastric rupture include stomach dilatation, free intraperitoneal air, intraperitoneal position of the nasogastric tube, intraperitoneal fluid collection, and extraluminal oral contrast.
The infusion rate of fluids through the tube must be slow enough to not cause the patient's stomach dilatation and reflux of content into the esophagus (the author proposes a rate of approximately 1 ml/30-40 seconds).