stomack

stomack

(ˈstʌmək)
n
(Physiology) have a stomack informal E African to be pregnant
References in periodicals archive ?
Another man jested with his dinner guests that he had fed them a baked cat, provoking one of them to fall into a "violent ague and distemper of her stomack." Still more examples take us into the animal kingdom: we are told that tortoises and ostriches can hatch their eggs with "looks only," while hares and partridges "grow white by the snowe vpon mountains" (44-45).
After that the humour hath been purged, to comfort the stomack and bind the vpper mouth (Treatise of the Diseases of Women, GUL 303, 17th-century).
The second is produced, when as this humor is diffused through the veines generally over all the body: And the last is Flatuous, or Hypocondriacall Melancholy: so called for that the substance of this disease is seated in the Hypocondries, which comprehend the Liver, Spleen, Mesentery, Guts, the veine of the Matrix, and other adjoyning parts; all which may be the seat of Hypocondriacall Melancholy; and not the Orifice of the Stomack only, which was the opinion of the Ancient Physitian Diocles.
And when the body is once tender and feeble, the stomack and Spirit must needes bear a great deale the weaker.
no--a Woman mask'd, like a cover'd Dish, gives a Man curiosity, and appetite, when, it may be, uncover'd, 'twou'd turn his stomack; no, no.
Hall repeatedly asserts the masculine nature of Margaret's character: a "manly woman, using to rule and not to be ruled" (Bullough 176); she "excelled all other, as well in beauty and favor, as in wit and pollicie, and was of stomack and corage, more like to a man, then a woman" (102).
Rachel Stanley, Pioneer Hi-Bred Intl., Inc., Referred by Bekah McCurdy Kayla Stomack
A police spokesman said the Palestinian was wounded in the stomack.
(84) "The signes and marks drawn from the fruits of sanctification" seemed "at very best" to be "litigious and doubtfull evidences." (85) Whereas Preston and Sibbes delighted in the duty-promoting passage of the Spirit from Christic head to sanctified member, Crisp was ever aware of the latter's debility and corruption: he fixed his revulsion on the flesh that, "like the Vipers stomack, ...
In 1605, Charles de Rochefort wrote in his "Histoire Naturelle et Morale des Iles Antilles de l'Amerique" that pineapple juice "admirably recreates and exhilarates the Spirits and comfort[s] the Heart; it also fortifies the Stomack, cureth quesiness and causeth Appetite" (J.
My stomack was being gnawed alternately by little grunts of emptiness and uneasiness.