stomal


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to stomal: stomal ulcer

sto·ma

 (stō′mə)
n. pl. sto·ma·ta (-mə-tə) or sto·mas
1. Botany One of the minute pores in the epidermis of a leaf or stem through which gases and water vapor pass. Also called stomate.
2. Anatomy A small aperture in the surface of a membrane.
3. A surgically constructed opening, especially one in the abdominal wall that permits the passage of waste after a colostomy or ileostomy.
4. Zoology A mouthlike opening, such as the oral cavity of a nematode.

[New Latin, from Greek, mouth.]

sto′mal, sto′ma·tal adj.

stomal

(ˈstəʊməl)
adj
of, pertaining to, or near a stoma or opening on a plant or animal
Translations

sto·mal

n. estomal, rel. a un estoma.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
DRG_CCR] AP-DRG AP-DRG LABEL 162 INGUINAL & FEMORAL HERNIA PROCEDURES AGE >17 W/O CC 867 LOCAL EXCISION & REMOVAL OF INT FIX DEVICES EXCEPT HIP & FEMUR W/O CC 219 LOWER EXTREM & HUMER PROC EXC HIPFOOTFEMUR AGE >17 W/O CC 167 APPENDECTOMY W/O COMPLICATED PRINCIPAL DIAG W/O CC 158 ANAL & STOMAL PROCEDURES W/O CC 105 CARDIAC VALVE & OTHER MAJOR CARDIOTHORACIC PROC W/O CARDIAC CATH 808 PERCUTANEOUS CARDIOVASCULAR PROC W AMI,HEART FAILURE OR SHOCK 112 PERCUTANEOUS CARDIOVASCULAR PROC W/O AMI,HEART FAILURE OR SHOCK 410 CHEMOTHERAPY 494 LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY W/O C.
FOUR OF the six members of the NZNO Stomal Therapy Section committee were elected at our biennial general meeting last November in Auckland.
Patients were assessed for the emotional stability and intelligence required to undergo rehabilitation and to understand the need for conscientious lifelong stomal wound care and hygiene.
Two of 8 patients (25%) whose ipsilateral lobe of the thyroid gland was not removed experienced a stomal recurrence.
14) Minor complications with infection or inflammation of the ostomy site have been described in cats; therefore, daily monitoring of the stomal wound is recommended.
Bariatric surgery has included both gastric banding, which regressed NASH, and the more extreme Roux-en-Y, which reversed fatty liver in 89% to 100% of patients but caused dumping syndrome, stomach staple failure, nutritional deficiencies, bowel complaints, follow-up operations, osteoporosis, infections and ulcers, deep vein thrombosis, stomal stenosis, and cholelithiasis, among other chronic conditions.
2,3) Application of a stomal appliance to divert the fistula output is impossible due to the absence of surrounding skin.
The subacute type usually presents at 3 to 4 weeks after surgery and is associated with ischemia, stomal ulcers, and fibrosis at the gastro-jejunostomy.
we gratefully acknowledge the expert clinical care and cooperation of numerous clinicians at each of the hospitals, including: i) Anaesthetist: Michele Joseph; ii) Surgeons: Peter Nottle, Roger Wale, David watters, Simon Crowley, Darrin Goodall wilson, Mal Steele, Michael Grigg; iii) Nurses: Anne Spranklin, Ross O'Brien, Vanessa Cuthbert; Vicki wall, wendy Brack, Sarah Burns, Lauren Savage; iv) Dieticians: Ibolya Nyulasi, Sarah Jukes, Michelle McPhee, Anna Boltong; v) Physiotherapists: Jim Sayer, Gemma Taylor, Val Bulmer, Pratichi Vasavada; vi) Occupational Therapist: Kristen Payne; vii) Stomal therapist: Stefan Demur.
As well as the normal risks of surgery, there can be complications including gastric band slippage, gallstones, a blockage known as a stomal stenosis after gastric bypass, and the development of food intolerances.
Survey of wound, ostomy, continence nurse clinicians on stomal and peristomal complications: A content validation study.