stomal


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Related to stomal: stomal ulcer

sto·ma

 (stō′mə)
n. pl. sto·ma·ta (-mə-tə) or sto·mas
1. Botany One of the minute pores in the epidermis of a leaf or stem through which gases and water vapor pass. Also called stomate.
2. Anatomy A small aperture in the surface of a membrane.
3. A surgically constructed opening, especially one in the abdominal wall that permits the passage of waste after a colostomy or ileostomy.
4. Zoology A mouthlike opening, such as the oral cavity of a nematode.

[New Latin, from Greek, mouth.]

sto′mal, sto′ma·tal adj.

stomal

(ˈstəʊməl)
adj
of, pertaining to, or near a stoma or opening on a plant or animal
Translations

sto·mal

n. estomal, rel. a un estoma.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The final recipients are rural Tairawhiti reproductive and sexual health nurse and midwife Tiziana Manea, for pregnancy ultrasound training, and Dunedin nurse Jillian Woodall, to study postgraduate stomal therapy through the Australian College of Nursing.
Incisionless revision of post-roux-en-Y bypass stomal and pouch dilation: Multicenter registry results.
Significant differences were not observed between the leaf stomal conductance (128.
Making an ileostomy gives definitive protection from intestinal leakage, but has its own inherent complication like dermatitis, stomal retraction, parastomal herniation and also is associated with psychological impact.
Patients were monitored for intraprocedural and postprocedural complications like: hemorrhage, stomal infection, injury to adjacent structures, arrhythmias, transient hypoxemia, transient hypotension, paratracheal insertion, pneumothorax, sub-cutaneous emphysema, loss of airway, accidental decannulation, tracheal ring fracture and new lung infiltrate or atelectasis.
Common postoperative complications of the ACE procedure are fecal leakage (43%), wound infection (52%), and stomal stenosis (39%).
Minor complications included ileus, peristomal infection, stomal leakage, buried bumper, gastric ulcer, fistulous tract, inadvertent tube removal, and tube malfunction.
Mesh was explanted for anastomotic leaks, stomal revision and for an
The signs and symptoms of tracheal granulation tissue vary depending on the location involved; glottic, subglottic, stomal, and substomal granulation have been reported.
In late complication, the most common was scarring (8), followed by difficult decannulations (4), stomal granulations (2), and subglottic stenosis (2).