stone-deaf

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stone-deaf

(stōn′dĕf′)
adj.
Completely deaf.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stone-deaf

adj
(Pathology) completely deaf
Usage: Use of the term stone-deaf to refer to people with serious hearing difficulties is potentially very offensive: preferred form: profoundly deaf
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

stone′-deaf′



adj.
totally deaf.
[1830–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.stone-deaf - totally deafstone-deaf - totally deaf; unable to hear anything
deaf - lacking or deprived of the sense of hearing wholly or in part
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

stone-deaf

[ˈstəʊnˈdef] ADJsordo como una tapia, sordo del todo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

stone-deaf

[ˌstəʊnˈdɛf] adjsordo/a come una campana
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

stone

(stəun) noun
1. (also adjective) (of) the material of which rocks are composed. limestone; sandstone; a stone house; stone walls; In early times, men made tools out of stone.
2. a piece of this, of any shape or size. He threw a stone at the dog.
3. a piece of this shaped for a special purpose. a tombstone; paving-stones; a grindstone.
4. a gem or jewel. She lost the stone out of her ring; diamonds, rubies and other stones.
5. the hard shell containing the nut or seed in some fruits eg peaches and cherries. a cherry-stone.
6. a measure of weight still used in Britain, equal to 6.35 kilogrammes. She weighs 9.5 stone.
7. a piece of hard material that forms in the kidney, bladder etc and causes pain.
verb
1. to throw stones at, especially as a ritual punishment. Saint Stephen was stoned to death.
2. to remove the stones from (fruit). She washed and stoned the cherries.
ˈstony adjective
1. full of, or covered with, stones. stony soil; a stony path/beach; It's very stony around here.
2. (of a person's expression etc) like stone in coldness, hardness etc. He gave me a stony stare.
ˈstonily adverb
ˈstoniness noun
ˌstone-ˈcold, ˌstone-ˈdead, ˌstone-ˈdeaf adjective
completely cold, dead, or deaf. He's almost stone-deaf; Your soup is stone-cold. He was stone-dead.
ˈstoneware noun, adjective
(of) a hard type of pottery made of clay containing pieces of stone. a stoneware jug.
ˈstonework noun
construction done in stone, especially the stone parts of a building.
leave no stone unturned
to try every possible means. The police left no stone unturned to (try to) find the child.
a stone's throw
a very short distance. They live only a stone's throw away from here.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
He'll need somebody--a hopeless cripple, and stone deaf with that."
"Stone deaf? I didn't know," murmured Natalia Haldin.
"Yes, Natalia Victorovna, he shall need somebody when they dismiss him, on crutches and stone deaf from the hospital.
Three years later she was stone deaf, and spoke in a very loud voice even in church.
He's had so many blank cartridges fired into his ears that he's stone deaf. And Selim--he lost his heart with his teeth.
"Well, Mester Taft," shouted old Martin, at the utmost stretch of his voice--for though he knew the old man was stone deaf, he could not omit the propriety of a greeting--"you're hearty yet.
They spoke to him in very loud voices as if he were stone deaf. They constructed sentences, by way of teaching him the language in its purity, such as were addressed by the savages to Captain Cook, or by Friday to Robinson Crusoe.
Rather to her surprise, he became stone deaf on a sudden, to her last question.
The old gentleman let him talk for some time, and then remarked, in a tone of rapturous enjoyment: "Stone deaf," and added, "Nasty things."
For another thing that's gone really swell - he's gone stone deaf as well!
class="MsoNormalBut I am sure there are many of us in salvation-seeking congregations who wish that our pastors, priests and preachers would talk to us, speak to us as normal, intelligent human beings, instead of hectoring us with noise as if we were stone deaf.
They must be stone deaf. Besides that, you have provided a constant tide of cash, even though they spend it like toilet paper.