stonecutting


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stone·cut·ter

 (stōn′kŭt′ər)
n.
1. One that cuts or carves stone.
2. A machine that is used to dress stone.

stone′cut′ting n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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The first replied, "I am making a living." The second kept on hammering while he said, "I am doing the best job of stonecutting in the entire country." The third one looked up with a visionary gleam in his eyes and said, "I am building a cathedral." The third man is, of course, the true manager.
The most prominent in the narrative involves the young boys engaged in stonecutting. As the camera focuses on these boys, their frames pitted against the immensity of the mountain, they are dwarfed and made vulnerable by the grueling labor conditions and the seeming inescapability of work as survival.
The patient ignored swelling, erythema, and fever he experienced around the same period when the stonecutting occurred and decided not to seek medical intervention until he was no longer able to ignore the symptoms.
Next to Breen was a smaller stone that said, "Engstrom"--Swedish, I reflected, latecomers of a sort when it came to Catholic cemeteries--but it was really because Doug's father, Leonard, had married Katherine Breen, both from farm families on Dry Creek, though Leonard was barely a generation beyond stonecutting. Any Catholicism he'd practiced was desultory and often marked by sarcastic comments that amused Doug and me to no end when Leonard and his brothers gathered on Sundays to sip bourbon and gently mock both the Church and the ways of the army they'd all been drafted into.
workers, including more than 100,000 workers in high risk jobs such as abrasive blasting, foundry work, stonecutting, rock drilling, quarry work and tunneling.
One of Moa's most important contributions to knowledge was as an interpreter of facts outside of the established discourse: as an architect, he created fine, intuitive syntheses between structure and ornament, carpentry and stonecutting, social hierarchy and architectural form, word and building --relationships that traditional anthropological scholarship had not quite been able to comprehend.
Similarly, we've set up a big stonecutting operation; we've already cut four acres [approximately 1.6 hectares] of stone for use in the buildings.
For Look Homeward, Angel, Russell Parkman designed a flexible set depicting the front of Eliza Gant's multistory boardinghouse that changed into W.O.'s stonecutting shop, which was hidden behind Dixieland's front facade.
Thanks to a man who comes to town to build his version of a cathedral, she discovers love, escape and her own talents through the craft of stonecutting. Merullo also has written a memoir about his hometown of Revere, and just about anything he pens is lovely and absorbing.
Later, he remarked, "If I could have been sure of living four times longer than I have lived I would have taken it on." The mechanical stonecutting equipment necessary for Michelangelo's project didn't actually come along until the 19th and 20th centuries.
The Amhara region will need many other projects such as Manale's to turn stonecutting into a thriving industry, capable of giving long-term job prospects.