stones


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Related to stones: Precious stones, Gemstones

stone

 (stōn)
n.
1.
a. Concreted earthy or mineral matter; rock.
b. Such concreted matter of a particular type. Often used in combination: sandstone; soapstone.
2. A small piece of rock.
3. Rock or a piece of rock shaped or finished for a particular purpose, especially:
a. A piece of rock that is used in construction: a coping stone; a paving stone.
b. A gravestone or tombstone.
c. A grindstone, millstone, or whetstone.
d. A milestone or boundary.
4. A gem or precious stone.
5. Something, such as a hailstone, resembling a stone in shape or hardness.
6. Botany The hard covering enclosing the seed in certain fruits, such as the cherry, plum, or peach.
7. Medicine A mineral concretion in an organ, such as the kidney or gallbladder, or other body part; a calculus.
8. pl. stone Abbr. st. A unit of weight in Great Britain, 14 pounds (6.4 kilograms).
9. Printing A table with a smooth surface on which page forms are composed.
adj.
1. Relating to or made of stone: a stone wall.
2. Made of stoneware or earthenware.
3. Complete; utter. Often used in combination: a stone liar; stone-deaf.
adv.
Completely; utterly: stone cold; standing stone still.
tr.v. stoned, ston·ing, stones
1. To hurl or throw stones at, especially to kill with stones.
2. To remove the stones or pits from.
3. To furnish, fit, pave, or line with stones.
4. To rub on or with a stone in order to polish or sharpen.
5. Sports To block a shot taken by (an opponent). Used of a goalie.
6. Obsolete To make hard or indifferent.

[Middle English, from Old English stān; see stāi- in Indo-European roots.]

Stones

(stəʊnz)
pl n
(Biography) the. See Rolling Stones

Stones

See also gems; geology

a construction consisting of two or more upright stones with a third on top, regarded by archaeologists as an ancient tomb or monument.
a stone tool, as one used in the early Stone Age. — eolithic, adj.
the process of turning to stone. Also called petrifaction, petrification.
the worship of rocks and stones. — lithoidolater, n. — lithoidolatrous, adj.
a form of divination involving rocks or stones.
a tool made of stone, usually about 12 inches long.
a stone of great size, as found in the monuments and constructions of ancient, particularly prehistoric, peoples. — megalithic, adj.
an upright, monumental stone, as a cromlech, standing by itself or in a group or circle with others.
a single large block of stone used in architecture or sculpture. — monolithic, adj.
a stone artifact from the Neolithic (Stone) Age.
a stonelike concretion in the inner ear of some vertebrates, as the whale.
a form of divination involving pebbles. Also called psephology.
lapidification.
the study of drawings or carvings made on rocks by a member of a prehistoric or primitive people. Also called petrography. — petroglyph, n. — petroglyphic, adj.
the quality or condition of being sandy or gritty, as a stone. — sab-ulous, adj.

stones

Stones, also called calculi, formed from substances that have precipitated out of urine. They can occur in the kidneys, ureters, or bladder and may require surgery.
References in classic literature ?
I shall never `go and marry' anyone," observed Meg, walking on with great dignity while the others followed, laughing, whispering, skipping stones, and `behaving like children', as Meg said to herself, though she might have been tempted to join them if she had not had her best dress on.
A forest came down to the road and through the forest Wine Creek wriggled its way over stones toward a distant river.
On the sculptured stones in the Copan valley there are characters which seem to resemble very ancient writing, but this pictographic writing is largely untranslatable.
Let them burn their powder," said the deliberate scout, while bullet after bullet whizzed by the place where he securely lay; "there will be a fine gathering of lead when it is over, and I fancy the imps will tire of the sport afore these old stones cry out for mercy
This was a fountain, set round with a rim of old mossy stones, and paved, in its bed, with what appeared to be a sort of mosaic-work of variously colored pebbles.
If the children gathered about her, as they sometimes did, Pearl would grow positively terrible in her puny wrath, snatching up stones to fling at them, with shrill, incoherent exclamations, that made her mother tremble, because they had so much the sound of a witch's anathemas in some unknown tongue.
Away, then, they dashed through thick and thin; stones flying and sparks flashing at every bound.
When he had eaten all he wanted he would have what he called fun with the colts, throwing stones and sticks at them to make them gallop.
Then suddenly the big butcher president leaped upon a pile of stones and yelled: "It's off, boys.
It was only yesterday," said George, "as I was busy loading stones into a cart, that young Mas'r Tom stood there, slashing his whip so near the horse that the creature was frightened.
I looked again, and saw him standing in the middle of a boggy Stygian fen, surrounded by devils, and he had found his bounds without a doubt, three little stones, where a stake had been driven, and looking nearer, I saw that the Prince of Darkness was his surveyor.
Working by night, we stowed the powder in the tower -- dug stones out, on the inside, and buried the powder in the walls themselves, which were fifteen feet thick at the base.