stones


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Related to stones: Precious stones, Gemstones

stone

 (stōn)
n.
1.
a. Concreted earthy or mineral matter; rock.
b. Such concreted matter of a particular type. Often used in combination: sandstone; soapstone.
2. A small piece of rock.
3. Rock or a piece of rock shaped or finished for a particular purpose, especially:
a. A piece of rock that is used in construction: a coping stone; a paving stone.
b. A gravestone or tombstone.
c. A grindstone, millstone, or whetstone.
d. A milestone or boundary.
4. A gem or precious stone.
5. Something, such as a hailstone, resembling a stone in shape or hardness.
6. Botany The hard covering enclosing the seed in certain fruits, such as the cherry, plum, or peach.
7. Medicine A mineral concretion in an organ, such as the kidney or gallbladder, or other body part; a calculus.
8. pl. stone Abbr. st. A unit of weight in Great Britain, 14 pounds (6.4 kilograms).
9. Printing A table with a smooth surface on which page forms are composed.
adj.
1. Relating to or made of stone: a stone wall.
2. Made of stoneware or earthenware.
3. Complete; utter. Often used in combination: a stone liar; stone-deaf.
adv.
Completely; utterly: stone cold; standing stone still.
tr.v. stoned, ston·ing, stones
1. To hurl or throw stones at, especially to kill with stones.
2. To remove the stones or pits from.
3. To furnish, fit, pave, or line with stones.
4. To rub on or with a stone in order to polish or sharpen.
5. Sports To block a shot taken by (an opponent). Used of a goalie.
6. Obsolete To make hard or indifferent.

[Middle English, from Old English stān; see stāi- in Indo-European roots.]

Stones

(stəʊnz)
pl n
(Biography) the. See Rolling Stones

Stones

See also gems; geology

a construction consisting of two or more upright stones with a third on top, regarded by archaeologists as an ancient tomb or monument.
a stone tool, as one used in the early Stone Age. — eolithic, adj.
the process of turning to stone. Also called petrifaction, petrification.
the worship of rocks and stones. — lithoidolater, n. — lithoidolatrous, adj.
a form of divination involving rocks or stones.
a tool made of stone, usually about 12 inches long.
a stone of great size, as found in the monuments and constructions of ancient, particularly prehistoric, peoples. — megalithic, adj.
an upright, monumental stone, as a cromlech, standing by itself or in a group or circle with others.
a single large block of stone used in architecture or sculpture. — monolithic, adj.
a stone artifact from the Neolithic (Stone) Age.
a stonelike concretion in the inner ear of some vertebrates, as the whale.
a form of divination involving pebbles. Also called psephology.
lapidification.
the study of drawings or carvings made on rocks by a member of a prehistoric or primitive people. Also called petrography. — petroglyph, n. — petroglyphic, adj.
the quality or condition of being sandy or gritty, as a stone. — sab-ulous, adj.

stones

Stones, also called calculi, formed from substances that have precipitated out of urine. They can occur in the kidneys, ureters, or bladder and may require surgery.
References in classic literature ?
There had been a good deal of road-mending going on, and even where the stones were not freshly laid down there were a great many loose ones about.
The first and the mildest course is, by keeping the island hovering over such a town, and the lands about it, whereby he can deprive them of the benefit of the sun and the rain, and consequently afflict the inhabitants with dearth and diseases: and if the crime deserve it, they are at the same time pelted from above with great stones, against which they have no defence but by creeping into cellars or caves, while the roofs of their houses are beaten to pieces.
The smaller stones were transported to the shore by means of a chain formed by twenty-five or thirty peasants.
At the same period Barbicane laid the first sleepers of a railway fifteen miles in length, intended to unite Stones Hill with Tampa Town.
In the intervals of the stones immense trees have taken root, and their broad boughs stretching far over, and interlacing together, support a canopy almost impenetrable to the sun.
The bright stones that ye will see were dug out of the pit over which the Silent Ones are set, and stored here, I know not by whom, for that was done longer ago than even I remember.
It was a desert, weed-grown waste, littered thickly with stones the size of a man's fist.
John Jasper, on his way home through the Close, is brought to a stand-still by the spectacle of Stony Durdles, dinner-bundle and all, leaning his back against the iron railing of the burial-ground enclosing it from the old cloister-arches; and a hideous small boy in rags flinging stones at him as a well-defined mark in the moonlight.
smooth as the stones on which women grind their corn.
Nearly all were cut, and from these he gathered a handful and filled the pouch which dangled at his side--the uncut stones he tossed back into the chests.
They had power of command over other objects, could propel sticks and stones through the air, could even tie him a prisoner to a stick that rendered him helpless.
He was throwing stones at howling urchins from Devil's Row who were circling madly about the heap and pelting at him.