stony coral


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Related to stony coral: Soft coral

stony coral

stony coral

n
(Animals) any coral of the order Madreporaria, having a calcareous skeleton, aggregations of which form reefs and islands
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stony coral - corals having calcareous skeletons aggregations of which form reefs and islandsstony coral - corals having calcareous skeletons aggregations of which form reefs and islands
coral - marine colonial polyp characterized by a calcareous skeleton; masses in a variety of shapes often forming reefs
brain coral - massive reef-building coral having a convoluted and furrowed surface
staghorn coral, stag's-horn coral - large branching coral resembling antlers
mushroom coral - flattened disk-shaped stony coral (usually solitary and unattached)
References in periodicals archive ?
The reef system is home to more than 65 species of stony coral, 350 species of mollusk, and more than 50 species of fish.
The removal of shells and stony coral from their natural habitats threatens the entire eco-system.
At least six species of soft coral and one species of stony coral were observed.
Stony coral skeletons are dense and rocky, often persisting long after coral colonies have died.
A band more than 13 kilometers long bristled with pale, crisscrossing branches of a stony coral, the ivory tree coral Lophelia pertusa.
From 1996 to 1999, stony coral cover decreased 38% on average in the 160 stations sponsored by the U.
The vast majority of fish come from reefs in the Philippines and Indonesia--considered to be the world's most biologically diverse marine areas--and most stony coral comes from Indonesia.
In particular, the colonial stony coral Solenosmilia variabilis is particularly prevalent and forms a dense matrix of living and dead coral as new members of the colony grow up and over older members to reach as far into the current as possible.
Instead, the researchers placed it in a newly created order -- a classification equal to carnivoria in mammals or crocodilia in reptiles -- under the sub-class Hexacorallia, which includes stony corals, anemones, and black corals.
But a new research has revealed that soft corals, like stony corals, are one of the central building blocks of a reef.