stookie


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stookie

(ˈstʊkɪ)
n
1. (Building) stucco
2. (Building) plaster; plaster of Paris
3. (Art Terms) a statue: he stood there like a stookie.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Scotland, in the same era, Allan Prior's Glasgow-set Stookie (STV 1985) concentrated more on the eponymous young person's adventures with his peers than on his relationship with his social worker.
Davis's analysis of early television programs, such as Stookie Bill and Felix the Cat, serves as a particularly compelling interpretation of television's technical principles, exploring the philosophical nature of scanning and transmission in contrast to cinema and video.
The song implicitly critiques the religious practices introduced by the missionaries, which undermined nature-human interconnectivity through the words "dink hul ry die hemeltrein / ma die duiwel stookie vuur" (they think they ride the train to heaven / but the devil is the stoker).
The net result was a stookie (Glasgow slang for a plaster cast) and five weeks of enforced downtime.
I made up the quartet on a pair of crutches, my ankle held together with metal pins and a stookie.
We took the decision to get Stookie in when we knew Tomas was going to be out.
In many ways, Stookie Bill was perfect for the new medium.
I was verging on impressive, when two wheels snapped off, shot through the glass panel of the front door and I spent a fortnight in Stookie Central.
And he added: "I got my stookie off last week and I'm now back in training.
She certainly remembers visiting her dad's London lab as a child while he worked on colour broadcasts using a ventriloquist dummy called Stookie Bill.
I had badly crushed bones in the foot that they put the stookie on and all I can remember is the extreme pain when they removed it.