stool pigeon


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stool pigeon

n.
1. Slang A person acting as a decoy or as an informer, especially one who is a spy for the police.
2. A pigeon used as a decoy.

[From the practice of tying decoy pigeons to a stool to attract other pigeons.]

stool pigeon

(ˈstuːlɪ) ,

stoolie

or

stooly

n
1. (Hunting) a living or dummy pigeon used to decoy others
2. (Law) an informer for the police; nark
3. slang US a person acting as a decoy

stool′ pi`geon


n.
1. a pigeon used as a decoy.
2. Also called stool•ie (ˈstu li) Slang. a person employed or acting as a decoy or informer, esp. for the police.
[1820–30, Amer.]

stool pigeon

A person who betrays others, especially a criminal who informs on other criminals; from the old method of hunting pigeons by decoying them with another bird tethered to a stool.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stool pigeon - someone acting as an informer or decoy for the police
betrayer, blabber, informer, squealer, rat - one who reveals confidential information in return for money
2.stool pigeon - a dummy pigeon used to decoy others
bait, decoy, lure - something used to lure fish or other animals into danger so they can be trapped or killed

stool pigeon

noun
Slang. One who gives incriminating information about others:
Informal: rat, tipster.
Translations

stool pigeon

n
(lit, fig: = decoy) → Lockvogel m
(inf: = informer) → Spitzel m (inf)

stool pigeon

n (fam) → informatore/trice
References in periodicals archive ?
She could be an asset to Mano (elder brother) Digong because she would act as a stool pigeon.
Flaubert said, "One becomes a critic when one cannot be an artist, just as a man becomes a stool pigeon when he cannot be a soldier.
We hear too the elder mystic who might be a madman, who first appears as Bynum in Joe Tinter, and is a symbol of stubborn justice as Hambone in Two Trains Running, only to turn into the drunken wreck of Hedley in Seven Guitars, the Christian prophet Stool Pigeon in King Hedley 11, the nearly immortal.
For a long time I took that as an order, as if I were one of those nervous perspiring characters that would have been played by Sam Kydd in the old black-and-white days, a stool pigeon maybe who had grassed up Eddie the Chiv to the Old Bill and stood in peril of having his head nailed to the coffee table.
However, respect was restored after 125 pulsating minutes at Easter Road, courtesy of a competition, now sponsored by the loot from nefarious activities, which has too often been treated with the disdain of a stool pigeon.
On the debit side of Hitchens' ledger can be found the following: boor, bully, chickenhawk, hypocrite, misogynist, name-dropper, narcissist, sellout, snob, stool pigeon.
It also shows that Mileage Mead--Bully's former House running mate, chief of staff, and finally stool pigeon in the majority office--had his fill of Bully's bullying.
And the main difference between a homing pigeon of old, and a stool pigeon of today?
Consider the words we use to describe someone who informs on another's misdeeds: Fink, informant, rat, snitch, squealer, stool pigeon, and tattletale are just a few of the synonyms for whistleblower cited in Merriam-Webster's Dictionary.
The snitch, that much-maligned, usually marginalized staple figure of crime fiction, receives sympathetic centerstage treatment in compelling Hong Kong-set police meller "The Stool Pigeon.
Movies up for the Best Film award include Gallants, Detective Dee and the Mystery of the Phantom Flame, Ip Man 2, The Stool Pigeon, and Reign of Assassins, produced by John Woo and Terence Chang.