storm surge

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storm surge

n.
An unusual, often destructive rise in sea level above normal high-tide level in a coastal area, caused by a combination of low atmospheric pressure and strong onshore winds during a storm.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jamaica says it is far advanced in developing a tool to forecast storm surges on the island.
In a bid to save lives from the wrath of typhoons, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa) launched its revamped storm surge warning system, this time underscoring the impact of storm surges on communities.
The larger-than-usual sea levels that storms create - called 'storm surges' - can be several metres taller than ordinary waves, meaning they can crash over sea walls and defences.
Ambassador Jose Manuel Romualdez said Filipinos should prepare for storm surges, heavy rainfall and hurricane-force winds.
Record-breaking storm surges were recorded at Quarry Bay and at Tai Po Kau of 2.35 meters (7.7 feet) and 3.38 meters (11.1 feet) , respectively, surpassing the previous records of 1.77 meters (5.8 feet) in Quarry Bay from Typhoon Wanda in 1962 and 3.23 meters (10.6 feet) at Tai Po Kau from Typhoon Hope in 1979.
Mahar Lagmay said storm surges as high as six meters is projected to accompany the onslaught of the big typhoon.
As a result of the carrier's experience with Sandy and the issues its clients faced as well as claims for damage, AGCS is helping all its clients, especially those involved in shipping, prepare for storm surges with the following recommendations:
Caption: Storm surge, not surging storms: Storm surges, caused by winds pushing walls of water, can wreak havoc on communities, such as shown here In Everglades City, Florida.
That city and nearby Naples, Florida, will endure some of the strongest winds in the next few hours, the National Hurricane Center said, adding that the "storm surges that threaten to swallow Florida's coastal cities" could be more dangerous than the winds.
Following several years of quiet hurricane seasons, a new report by CoreLogic, a property information and analytics company based in Irvine, Calif., says that as many as 6.8 million homes along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts could be at risk for hurricane storm surges.
Manila: Typhoon Noul slammed into the northern tip of the Philippines on Sunday, triggering warnings of possible flash floods, landslides and storm surges and prompting almost 3,000 people to flee their homes.