storm-petrel


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storm-pet·rel

also storm petrel (stôrm′pĕt′rəl)
n.
Any of various small seabirds of the family Hydrobatidae, found in most of the world's oceans and generally having dark plumage. Also called stormy petrel.

[Probably from the fact that they take shelter in the lees of ships during storms.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Wilson's Storm-Petrel, Oceanites oceanicus, in flight
The other three animals are the Hawaiian population of the band-rumped storm-petrel (Oceanodroma castro), the orangeblack Hawaiian damselfly (Megalagrion xanthomelas) and the anchialine pool shrimp (Procaris hawaiana).
The acceptance of this (and subsequent records in 2011) as Swinhoe's Storm-Petrel was straightforward.
William is expected to be nibble on the Titi bird, the fatty chicks of the storm-petrel, raw seaweed, kina sea eggs and fiery pepper leaves.
A breeding colony of Wedge-rumped storm-petrel, Oceanodroma tethys kelsalli (Lowe 1925), on Santa Island-Peru
Other seabirds breeding there include Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel, Leach's Storm-Petrel, Brandt's Cormorant, Double-crested Cormorant, Pelagic Cormorant, Rhinoceros Auklet, Cassin's Auklet, Pigeon Guillemot Western Gull, Glaucous-winged Gull and Black Oystercatcher.
An extreme case is the British storm-petrel (Hydrobates pelagicus), which measures a mere 6 in (15 cm) from head to tail and which has acquired its (English) name from its clever habit of sheltering from heavy winds on the lee side of ships.
The Ashy Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma homochroa) is one of the least known seabird species because of its crevice-nesting and nocturnal habits.
Biologists with the Point Reyes Bird Observatory have been conducting monitoring and research on the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge through a cooperative agreement with the FWS for over 25 years (roughly the life-span of an ashy storm-petrel), and they will monitor the success of the gull control project.
There is evidence supporting this hypothesis from studies of the Leach's Storm-Petrel Oceanodroma leucorhoa (Ricklefs and Minor 1991, Hamer and Hill 1994, Bolton 1995, Mauck and Grubb 1995) and the Antarctic Petrel Thalassoica antarctica (Andersen et al.
Leach's storm-petrel nest burrows were checked for occupancy during May, June, and October 1984 and February 1985.