stormy


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storm·y

 (stôr′mē)
adj. storm·i·er, storm·i·est
1. Subject to, characterized by, or affected by storms; tempestuous.
2. Characterized by violent emotions, passions, speech, or actions: a stormy argument.

storm′i·ly adv.
storm′i·ness n.

stormy

(ˈstɔːmɪ)
adj, stormier or stormiest
1. (Physical Geography) characterized by storms
2. subject to, involving, or characterized by violent disturbance or emotional outburst
ˈstormily adv
ˈstorminess n

storm•y

(ˈstɔr mi)

adj. storm•i•er, storm•i•est.
1. indicative of or characterized by storms; tempestuous: stormy seas.
2. full of turmoil or strife.
[1150–1200]
storm′i•ly, adv.
storm′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.stormy - (especially of weather) affected or characterized by storms or commotion; "a stormy day"; "wide and stormy seas"
inclement - (of weather or climate) severe
unpeaceful - not peaceful; "unpeaceful times"; "an unpeaceful marriage"
calm - (of weather) free from storm or wind; "calm seas"
2.stormy - characterized by violent emotions or behavior; "a stormy argument"; "a stormy marriage"
unpeaceful - not peaceful; "unpeaceful times"; "an unpeaceful marriage"

stormy

adjective
2. rough, wild, turbulent, tempestuous, raging the stormy waters that surround the British Isles
3. angry, heated, fierce, passionate, fiery, impassioned, tumultuous The letter was read at a stormy meeting.

stormy

adjective
1. Violently disturbed or agitated, as by storms:
2. Marked by unrest or disturbance:
Translations
عاصِفعاصِف، صاخِب، هائِج
bouřlivý
stormendestormfuld
myrskyinen
olujni
ofsafenginnstormasamur
嵐の
폭풍의
nevihten
stormig
ราวกับพายุ
bão táp

stormy

[ˈstɔːmɪ]
A. ADJ (stormier (compar) (stormiest (superl)))
1. (lit) [weather, night, skies] → tormentoso
it's stormyhay tormenta
2. (fig) (= turbulent) [meeting, scene] → tumultuoso, turbulento; [relationship] → tormentoso
B. CPD stormy petrel N (Orn) → petrel m de la tempestad (fig) → persona f pendenciera, persona f de vida borrascosa

stormy

[ˈstɔːrmi] adj
[weather, night, seas] → orageux/euse
[meeting, relationship] → orageux/euse

stormy

adj (+er) (lit, fig)stürmisch; discussion also, temperhitzig; protestsheftig; he has a stormy temperer ist jähzornig; stormy waters (fig)turbulente Zeiten pl

stormy

[ˈstɔːmɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (also) (fig) → burrascoso/a, tempestoso/a

storm

(stoːm) noun
1. a violent disturbance in the air causing wind, rain, thunder etc. a rainstorm; a thunderstorm; a storm at sea; The roof was damaged by the storm.
2. a violent outbreak of feeling etc. A storm of anger greeted his speech; a storm of applause.
verb
1. to shout very loudly and angrily. He stormed at her.
2. to move or stride in an angry manner. He stormed out of the room.
3. (of soldiers etc) to attack with great force, and capture (a building etc). They stormed the castle.
ˈstormy adjective
1. having a lot of strong wind, heavy rain etc. a stormy day; stormy weather; a stormy voyage.
2. full of anger or uncontrolled feeling. in a stormy mood; a stormy discussion.
ˈstormily adverb
ˈstorminess noun
ˈstormbound adjective
prevented by storms from continuing with a voyage, receiving regular supplies etc. stormbound ships.
ˈstormtrooper noun
a soldier specially trained for violent and dangerous attacks.
a storm in a teacup
a fuss made over an unimportant matter.
take by storm
to capture by means of a sudden violent attack. The invaders took the city by storm.

stormy

عاصِف bouřlivý stormende stürmisch θυελλώδης tempestuoso myrskyinen orageux olujni tempestoso 嵐の 폭풍의 stormachtig stormfull burzowy tempestuoso бурный stormig ราวกับพายุ fırtınalı bão táp 狂风暴雨的
References in classic literature ?
Day and night he spent out in the open fields, and only when it was very wet and stormy did he take refuge in a little hut on the edge of a big forest.
Some accounts give rather a romantic origin to this affair, tracing it to the stormy night when M'Dougal, in the course of an exploring expedition, was driven by stress of weather to seek shelter in the royal abode of Comcomly.
We sympathize with your position, but the night of the 14th was stormy and confused, and--you may have to anchor on a stranger's chimney yourself some night.
From childhood's hour I have not been As others were - I have not seen As others saw - I could not bring My passions from a common spring - From the same source I have not taken My sorrow - I could not awaken My heart to joy at the same tone - And all I lov'd - I lov'd alone - Then - in my childhood - in the dawn Of a most stormy life - was drawn From ev'ry depth of good and ill The mystery which binds me still - From the torrent, or the fountain - From the red cliff of the mountain - From the sun that 'round me roll'd In its autumn tint of gold - From the lightning in the sky As it pass'd me flying by - From the thunder, and the storm - And the cloud that took the form(When the rest of Heaven was blue) Of a demon in my view -
And the rest would be lost to me in a stormy gust of wind.
It was wretched weather; stormy and wet, stormy and wet; and mud, mud, mud, deep in all the streets.
True, we had head winds all the time, and several stormy experiences which sent fifty percent of the passengers to bed sick and made the ship look dismal and deserted--stormy experiences that all will remember who weathered them on the tumbling deck and caught the vast sheets of spray that every now and then sprang high in air from the weather bow and swept the ship like a thunder-shower; but for the most part we had balmy summer weather and nights that were even finer than the days.
But as he read it, a death- like pallor stole over his face, and an expression of deep-seated wrath, illumined by the many-colored fire which gleamed so brightly, soaringly around the scene, produced a terrible spectacle, which every one would have shuddered at, could they only have read into his heart, now torn by the most stormy and most bitter passions.
For the last time the wild cherry-tree bloomed,--wonderful blossom, glittering with tears, and gloriously radiant with stormy lights of wild passion and wilder hopes.
And for three days afterwards the sea was stormy. Gray clouds chased one another across the sky.
A few weeks afterward, as Buell's leading division was being ferried over the Tennessee River to assist in succoring Grant's beaten army, night was coming on, black and stormy. Through the wreck of battle the division moved, inch by inch, in the direction of the enemy, who had withdrawn a little to reform his lines.
491 d: And the author of "The Astronomy", which is attributed forsooth to Hesiod, always calls them (the Pleiades) Peleiades: `but mortals call them Peleiades'; and again, `the stormy Peleiades go down'; and again, `then the Peleiades hide away....'

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