stovepiped


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

stove·pipe

 (stōv′pīp′)
n.
1. A pipe, usually of thin sheet metal, used to conduct smoke or fumes from a stove into a chimney flue.
2. A very tall hat with a flat crown and narrow brim, traditionally made of silk.
3. Informal A pathway for transmitting information higher in a hierarchy while bypassing intervening levels that remain uninformed about this information.
tr.v. stove·piped, stove·pip·ing, stove·pipes Informal
To transmit (information) up in a hierarchy by means of a stovepipe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.stovepiped - of or relating to data stored in separate databases; "stovepiped information"
computer science, computing - the branch of engineering science that studies (with the aid of computers) computable processes and structures
References in periodicals archive ?
During the assessment, a common theme emerged - historically, data has been stored, by the military and industry, in proprietary stovepiped systems.
Running out to buy the latest gadgets also creates stovepiped systems when NATO nations come together to train, he said.
Our current modernization process is industrial age; it's staff-centric and stovepiped, overly bureaucratic and slow.
While that point is well taken, it is important to note that al Qaeda also doesn't have fifth-generation stealth aircraft, a stovepiped Service-led acquisition process, and taxpayer accountability.
In many enterprises, both unstructured and structured data tend to be stovepiped and difficult to access for those who are not the owners or lack in-depth technical data skills.
war" and that successive American Presidents "tolerated and even promoted stovepiped, semi-independent campaigns waged simultaneously by different agencies of American government." Coll also chronicles the divide that far too often bedeviled U.S.
intelligence-sharing opportunities, transforming a stovepiped community
You can simply sweep the stovepiped spent case across your pants leg, belt, or holster to get the gun back in the fight.
Hilton begins with a logical explanation of how we got to huge, overly structured schools, stovepiped companies, and even boring and bland work, public, and home spaces.
While the COE requires the Army to invest in improved infrastructure--such as high-performing servers that can do the work previously performed by multiple machines--the overall hardware footprint will significantly decrease as stovepiped mission command systems are replaced by integrated web applications.
But as Brennan complained last month, those directorates have been too "stovepiped." That's putting it mildly.