straggle

(redirected from stragglers)
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strag·gle

 (străg′əl)
intr.v. strag·gled, strag·gling, strag·gles
1.
a. To move or proceed slowly or in a scattered or irregular group: "The millworkers straggled out for lunch" (Carson McCullers).
b. To move or lag behind another or others: "Bawling calves straggled after cows" (Jean M. Auel).
2. To extend or be spread out: "The willow herb straggled over the heaps of rubble" (George Orwell).
3. To hang limply or loosely: "the potbellied man, whose dirty hair straggled to his shoulders" (Stephen King).
n.
A scattered or disorderly group, as of people or things.

[Middle English straglen, to wander.]

strag′gler n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

straggle

(ˈstræɡəl)
vb (intr)
1. to go, come, or spread in a rambling or irregular way; stray
2. to linger behind or wander from a main line or part
[C14: of uncertain origin; perhaps related to strake and stretch]
ˈstraggler n
ˈstraggling adj
ˈstragglingly adv
ˈstraggly adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

strag•gle

(ˈstræg əl)

v.i. -gled, -gling.
1. to stray from the road, course, or line of march.
2. to wander about; ramble.
3. to spread at irregular intervals: trees straggling over the hillside.
[1350–1400; Middle English straglen, of uncertain orig.]
strag′gler, n.
strag′gling•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

straggle


Past participle: straggled
Gerund: straggling

Imperative
straggle
straggle
Present
I straggle
you straggle
he/she/it straggles
we straggle
you straggle
they straggle
Preterite
I straggled
you straggled
he/she/it straggled
we straggled
you straggled
they straggled
Present Continuous
I am straggling
you are straggling
he/she/it is straggling
we are straggling
you are straggling
they are straggling
Present Perfect
I have straggled
you have straggled
he/she/it has straggled
we have straggled
you have straggled
they have straggled
Past Continuous
I was straggling
you were straggling
he/she/it was straggling
we were straggling
you were straggling
they were straggling
Past Perfect
I had straggled
you had straggled
he/she/it had straggled
we had straggled
you had straggled
they had straggled
Future
I will straggle
you will straggle
he/she/it will straggle
we will straggle
you will straggle
they will straggle
Future Perfect
I will have straggled
you will have straggled
he/she/it will have straggled
we will have straggled
you will have straggled
they will have straggled
Future Continuous
I will be straggling
you will be straggling
he/she/it will be straggling
we will be straggling
you will be straggling
they will be straggling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been straggling
you have been straggling
he/she/it has been straggling
we have been straggling
you have been straggling
they have been straggling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been straggling
you will have been straggling
he/she/it will have been straggling
we will have been straggling
you will have been straggling
they will have been straggling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been straggling
you had been straggling
he/she/it had been straggling
we had been straggling
you had been straggling
they had been straggling
Conditional
I would straggle
you would straggle
he/she/it would straggle
we would straggle
you would straggle
they would straggle
Past Conditional
I would have straggled
you would have straggled
he/she/it would have straggled
we would have straggled
you would have straggled
they would have straggled
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.straggle - a wandering or disorderly grouping (of things or persons); "a straggle of outbuildings"; "a straggle of followers"
group, grouping - any number of entities (members) considered as a unit
Verb1.straggle - wander from a direct or straight course
deviate, divert - turn aside; turn away from
2.straggle - go, come, or spread in a rambling or irregular way; "Branches straggling out quite far"
spread, distribute - distribute or disperse widely; "The invaders spread their language all over the country"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

straggle

verb
1. trail, drift, wander, range, lag, stray, roam, ramble, rove, loiter, string out They came straggling up the cliff road.
2. hang (down), trail, dangle, sag, droop Her grey hair straggled in wisps about her face.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

straggle

verb
To grow or spread in a disorderly or planless fashion:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يَتَخَلَّف عن الرَّكْبيَنْتَشِر في غَيْرِ نِظام
růst neuspořádánězpožďovat se
sakke bagud
összevissza nő
dragast afturúrdreifa/láta vaxa óreglulega
atsilikėlisišsidraikęsišsidraikymasišsimėtęsišsimėtymas
atpaliktbūt izklaidunekārtīgi augt/plestiesnoklīst
oneskorovať sarásť neporiadne
ayrı düşmekdağınık bir biçimde yayılmakgeride kalmak

straggle

[ˈstrægl] VI
1. (= lag behind) → rezagarse
the guests straggled out into the nightlos invitados salieron poco a poco y desaparecieron en la noche
as the last runners straggled over the finishing linea medida que iban cruzando la meta los últimos corredores ...
2. (= spread untidily) (Bot) → lozanear; [hair] → caer lacio
the village straggles on for milesel pueblo se extiende varios kilómetros (sin tener un plano fijo)
her hair straggles over her faceel pelo le cae lacio delante de la cara
straggle away straggle off VI + ADVdispersarse
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

straggle

[ˈstrægəl] vi
[people] → s'éparpiller, s'égailler
[things]
The houses straggled down the hillside → Les maisons s'éparpillaient sur le flanc de la colline.
Her grey hair straggled in wisps about her face → Ses cheveux gris tombaient en mèches sur son visage.
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

straggle

vi
(= spread untidily, houses, trees) → verstreut liegen; (hair)(unordentlich) hängen; (plant)(in die Länge) wuchern, in die Höhe schießen; the town straggles on for milesdie Stadt zieht sich über Meilen hin
to straggle behindzurückbleiben, hinterherzockeln (inf); to straggle behind the leaderin weitem Abstand hinter dem Führer zurückbleiben or hinterherzockeln (inf); to straggle along the roaddie Straße entlangbummeln or -zockeln (inf); to straggle in/outvereinzelt kommen/gehen; stop stragglingbleibt beieinander
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

straggle

[ˈstrægl] vi (lag behind) → rimanere indietro; (spread untidily) → estendersi disordinatamente
to straggle in/out → entrare/uscire uno ad uno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

straggle

(ˈstrӕgl) verb
1. to grow or spread untidily. His beard straggled over his chest.
2. to walk too slowly to remain with a body of eg marching soldiers, walkers etc.
ˈstraggler noun
a person who walks too slowly during a march etc and gets left behind. A car was sent to pick up the stragglers.
ˈstraggly adjective
straggling untidily. straggly hair.
ˈstraggliness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Hunt, with a long train of pack horses, moving across plains or naked hills, is discoverable at a great distance by Indian scouts, who spread the intelligence rapidly to various points, and assemble their friends to hang about the skirts of the travellers, steal their horses, or cut off any stragglers from the main body.
This rear-guard had devoted itself to the task of saving a frightful multitude of stragglers overcome by the cold, who obstinately refused to leave the bivouacs of the army.
As I proceeded I became more and more convinced that the extermination of mankind was, save for such stragglers as myself, already accomplished in this part of the world.
A battery chang- ing position at a frantic gallop scattered the stragglers right and left.
The house was destroyed by fire in the year following- -probably by some stragglers from the retreating column of General George W.
The spectacle of a matron of classical deportment, seizing an ancient woman by the throat, and hauling her into a dwelling-house, would have been under any circumstances, sufficient temptation to all true English stragglers so blest as to witness it, to force a way into that dwelling-house and see the matter out.
I walked with the utmost circumspection, to avoid treading on any stragglers who might remain in the streets, although the orders were very strict, that all people should keep in their houses, at their own peril.
Though the troops were ill-clad, exhausted, and had lost a third of their number in killed, wounded, sick, and stragglers; though a number of sick and wounded had been abandoned on the other side of the Danube with a letter in which Kutuzov entrusted them to the humanity of the enemy; and though the big hospitals and the houses in Krems converted into military hospitals could no longer accommodate all the sick and wounded, yet the stand made at Krems and the victory over Mortier raised the spirits of the army considerably.
They were proceeding onward without noise, when a scout who had been creeping about the ditches all night, to warn any stragglers from encroaching further on what was now such dangerous ground, peeped cautiously from his hiding-place, and called to them to stop.
"It is possible that the Indians and stragglers of the enemy may intrude, in which case you will remind them of the terms of the capitulation, and threaten to report their conduct to Montcalm.
The congregation being fully assembled, now, the bell rang once more, to warn laggards and stragglers, and then a solemn hush fell upon the church which was only broken by the tittering and whispering of the choir in the gallery.
But the return was no such easy matter: the stones were smooth and neatly cemented, and the rose-bushes and black-berry stragglers could yield no assistance in re-ascending.