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Strand

 (strănd)
A thoroughfare in west-central London, England, running parallel to the northern bank of the Thames River and eastward from Trafalgar Square in the West End to the City of London. Among its well-known fixtures is the Savoy Hotel.

strand 1

 (strănd)
n.
Land, typically a beach, bordering a body of water.
v. strand·ed, strand·ing, strands
v.tr.
1.
a. To drive or run (a boat, for example) ashore or aground.
b. To cause (a whale or other sea animal) to be unable to swim free from a beach or from shallow water.
2. To bring into or leave in a difficult or helpless position: The convoy was stranded in the desert.
3. Baseball To leave (a base runner) on base at the end of an inning.
4. Linguistics To separate (a grammatical element) from other elements in a construction, either by moving it out of the construction or moving the rest of the construction. In the sentence What are you aiming at, the preposition at has been stranded.
v.intr.
1. To be driven or run ashore or aground: The boat stranded on the rocks.
2. To be stranded, as on a beach. Used of sea animals.

[Middle English, from Old English.]

strand 2

 (strănd)
n.
1. A complex of fibers or filaments that have been twisted together to form a cable, rope, thread, or yarn.
2.
a. A single filament, such as a fiber or thread, of a woven or braided material.
b. A ropelike length of something: a strand of pearls; a strand of DNA.
c. A wisp or lock of hair.
3. One of the elements woven together to make an intricate whole, such as the plot of a novel.
tr.v. strand·ed, strand·ing, strands
1. To make or form (a rope, for example) by twisting strands together.
2. To break a strand of (a rope, for example).

[Middle English strond.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

strand

(strænd)
vb
1. to leave or drive (ships, fish, etc) aground or ashore or (of ships, fish, etc) to be left or driven ashore
2. (tr; usually passive) to leave helpless, as without transport or money, etc
n
3. (Physical Geography) a shore or beach
4. (Human Geography) a foreign country
[Old English; related to Old Norse strönd side, Middle High German strant beach, Latin sternere to spread]

strand

(strænd)
n
1. (Textiles) a set of or one of the individual fibres or threads of string, wire, etc, that form a rope, cable, etc
2. (Textiles) a single length of string, hair, wool, wire, etc
3. (Jewellery) a string of pearls or beads
4. a constituent element in a complex whole: one strand of her argument.
vb
(tr) to form (a rope, cable, etc) by winding strands together
[C15: of uncertain origin]

Strand

(strænd)
n
(Placename) the Strand a street in W central London, parallel to the Thames: famous for its hotels and theatres
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

strand1

(strænd)

v.t.
1. to drive or cause to run onto a shore; run aground.
2. to leave in a helpless position: stranded in the middle of nowhere.
v.i.
3. to become stranded.
n.
4. the land bordering a body of water; shore; beach.
[before 1000; Middle English (n.), Old English, c. Middle Low German strant, Old Norse strǫnd; akin to strew]

strand2

(strænd)

n.
1. one of the larger elements, each consisting of a bundle of yarns, that are plaited together to form a rope.
2. a similar part of a wire rope or cable.
3. any fiber or thread twisted or plaited into cord, string, etc.
4. a fiber or filament, as in animal or plant tissue.
5. an interwoven element in a larger structure: the strands of a plot.
6. a filament of hair.
7. any particular length of cord or string upon which pearls, beads, etc., are threaded.
v.t.
8. to form by twisting strands together.
9. to break one or more strands of (a rope).
[1490–1500; orig. uncertain]

Strand

(strænd)

n.
Mark, born 1934, U.S. poet, born in Canada: U.S. poet laureate 1990–91.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

strand


Past participle: stranded
Gerund: stranding

Imperative
strand
strand
Present
I strand
you strand
he/she/it strands
we strand
you strand
they strand
Preterite
I stranded
you stranded
he/she/it stranded
we stranded
you stranded
they stranded
Present Continuous
I am stranding
you are stranding
he/she/it is stranding
we are stranding
you are stranding
they are stranding
Present Perfect
I have stranded
you have stranded
he/she/it has stranded
we have stranded
you have stranded
they have stranded
Past Continuous
I was stranding
you were stranding
he/she/it was stranding
we were stranding
you were stranding
they were stranding
Past Perfect
I had stranded
you had stranded
he/she/it had stranded
we had stranded
you had stranded
they had stranded
Future
I will strand
you will strand
he/she/it will strand
we will strand
you will strand
they will strand
Future Perfect
I will have stranded
you will have stranded
he/she/it will have stranded
we will have stranded
you will have stranded
they will have stranded
Future Continuous
I will be stranding
you will be stranding
he/she/it will be stranding
we will be stranding
you will be stranding
they will be stranding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been stranding
you have been stranding
he/she/it has been stranding
we have been stranding
you have been stranding
they have been stranding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been stranding
you will have been stranding
he/she/it will have been stranding
we will have been stranding
you will have been stranding
they will have been stranding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been stranding
you had been stranding
he/she/it had been stranding
we had been stranding
you had been stranding
they had been stranding
Conditional
I would strand
you would strand
he/she/it would strand
we would strand
you would strand
they would strand
Past Conditional
I would have stranded
you would have stranded
he/she/it would have stranded
we would have stranded
you would have stranded
they would have stranded
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.strand - a pattern forming a unity within a larger structural whole; "he tried to pick up the strands of his former life"; "I could hear several melodic strands simultaneously"
pattern, form, shape - a perceptual structure; "the composition presents problems for students of musical form"; "a visual pattern must include not only objects but the spaces between them"
2.strand - line consisting of a complex of fibers or filaments that are twisted together to form a thread or a rope or a cable
line - something (as a cord or rope) that is long and thin and flexible; "a washing line"
ply - one of the strands twisted together to make yarn or rope or thread; often used in combination; "three-ply cord"; "four-ply yarn"
rope yarn - the strands out of which ropes are made
3.strand - a necklace made by a stringing objects together; "a string of beads"; "a strand of pearls";
necklace - jewelry consisting of a cord or chain (often bearing gems) worn about the neck as an ornament (especially by women)
4.strand - a very slender natural or synthetic fiberstrand - a very slender natural or synthetic fiber
barb - one of the parallel filaments projecting from the main shaft of a feather
cobweb, gossamer - filaments from a web that was spun by a spider
chromatid - one of two identical strands into which a chromosome splits during mitosis
myofibril, myofibrilla, sarcostyle - one of many contractile filaments that make up a striated muscle fiber
rhizoid - any of various slender filaments that function as roots in mosses and ferns and fungi etc
hypha - any of the threadlike filaments forming the mycelium of a fungus
paraphysis - a sterile simple or branched filament or hair borne among sporangia; may be pointed or clubbed
fiber, fibre - a slender and greatly elongated substance capable of being spun into yarn
5.strand - a poetic term for a shore (as the area periodically covered and uncovered by the tides)
shore - the land along the edge of a body of water
6.Strand - a street in west central London famous for its theaters and hotels
West End - the part of west central London containing the main entertainment and shopping areas
Verb1.strand - leave stranded or isolated with little hope of rescue; "the travellers were marooned"
desert, desolate, forsake, abandon - leave someone who needs or counts on you; leave in the lurch; "The mother deserted her children"
2.strand - drive (a vessel) ashore
land - bring ashore; "The drug smugglers landed the heroin on the beach of the island"
3.strand - bring to the ground; "the storm grounded the ship"
land - bring ashore; "The drug smugglers landed the heroin on the beach of the island"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

strand

noun
1. filament, fibre, thread, length, lock, string, twist, rope, wisp, tress high fences, topped by strands of barbed wire
2. component, part, element, ingredient, constituent, feature There have been two strands to his tactics.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

strand

noun
Something that suggests the continuousness of a fine continuous filament:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
تَجْنَح السَّفينَه، تَرْتَطِمخَيط، سِلْك مَجدولمَقْطوع من المال والأصْدِقاء
plážpramenztroskotatzůstat bez prostředků
gå på grundlokstrandtrådwire
rand
jännerantasäie
òáttur, òráîurskilinn eftir allslausstrand
atstāt bez palīdzības/likteņa varādiegsdzijaizmests krastāšķipsna
strand
iplikkaraya oturmaktelzor durumda kalmak

strand

1 [strænd] N
1. [of thread] → hebra f, hilo m; [of hair] → pelo m; [of rope] → ramal m; [of plant] → brizna f
2. (fig) [of plan, theory] → aspecto m, faceta f; [of story] → hilo m argumental

strand

2 [strænd]
A. N (= liter, beach, shore) → playa f
B. VT [+ ship] → varar, encallar
to be (left) stranded [ship, fish] → quedar varado (fig) [person] (without money) → quedar desamparado; (without transport) → quedar tirado
to leave sb stranded (in the lurch) → dejar a algn plantado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

strand

[ˈstrænd]
n
[thread] → brin m; [hair] → mèche f; [wire] → brin m
(= element) [plan, theory, idea] → axe m
vt [+ boat] → échouer
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

strand

1
n (liter, = beach) → Gestade nt (liter)
vt ship, fishstranden lassen; person (in place) → verschlagen, geraten lassen; (without money, help etc) → seinem Schicksal überlassen; to be stranded (ship, fish, shipwrecked person) → gestrandet sein; to be (left) stranded (person) → festsitzen; (without money also) → auf dem Trockenen sitzen (inf); to leave somebody strandedjdn seinem Schicksal überlassen

strand

2
nStrang m; (of hair)Strähne f; (of thread, wool)Faden m; (fig, in melody etc) → Melodienfolge f; (in story) → Handlungsfaden m; a three-strand necklaceeine dreireihige Halskette
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

strand

[strænd] n (of thread, pearls) → filo; (of hair) → ciocca
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

strand1

(strӕnd) : be stranded
1. (of a ship) to go aground. The ship was stranded on the rocks.
2. (also be left stranded) to be left helpless without eg money or friends. He was left stranded in Yugoslavia without his money or his passport.

strand2

(strӕnd) noun
a thin thread, eg one of those twisted together to form rope, string, knitting-wool etc, or a long thin lock of hair. She pushed the strands of hair back from her face.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

strand

n. filamento, hilo; fibra delicada.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
Strands of her black hair lay round her inflamed and perspiring cheeks, her charming rosy mouth with its downy lip was open and she was smiling joyfully.
It is difficult for a seaman to believe that his stranded ship does not feel as unhappy at the unnatural predicament of having no water under her keel as he is himself at feeling her stranded.
It is time to relate what a change took place in English public opinion when it transpired that the real bankrobber, a certain James Strand, had been arrested, on the 17th day of December, at Edinburgh.
SEEING a ship sailing by upon the sea of politics, an Ambitious Person started in hot pursuit along the strand; but the people's eyes being fixed upon the Presidency no one observed the pursuer.
Besides though New Bedford has of late been gradually monopolizing the business of whaling, and though in this matter poor old Nantucket is now much behind her, yet Nantucket was her great original --the Tyre of this Carthage; --the place where the first dead American whale was stranded. Where else but from Nantucket did those aboriginal whalemen, the Red-Men, first sally out in canoes to give chase to the Leviathan?
All down Wellington Street people could be seen fluttering out the pink sheets and reading, and the Strand was suddenly noisy with the voices of an army of hawkers following these pioneers.
I first saw her in one of the narrow streets leading from Leicester Square to the Strand. There was something in her face
Chief among these latter was a great Sperm Whale, which, after an unusually long raging gale, had been found dead and stranded, with his head against a cocoa-nut tree, whose plumage-like, tufted droopings seemed his verdant jet.
When he came back to his work after lunch he carried in his head a picture of the Strand, scattered with omnibuses, and of the purple shapes of leaves pressed flat upon the gravel, as if his eyes had always been bent upon the ground.
Arrived at Waterloo, she shook out her skirts with a little gesture of relief and started off to walk to the Strand. Half-way across the bridge she came face to face with a tall, good-looking young man who was hurrying in the opposite direction.
Buckingham desired the captain to be told to hold himself in readiness, but that, as the sea was beautiful, and as the day promised a splendid sunset, he did not intend to go on board until nightfall, and would avail himself of the evening to enjoy a walk on the strand. He added also, that, finding himself in such excellent company, he had not the least desire to hasten his embarkation.
From our new Cape Horn in Denmark, a chain of mountains, scarcely half the height of the Alps, would run in a straight line due southward; and on its western flank every deep creek of the sea, or fiord, would end in "bold and astonishing glaciers." These lonely channels would frequently reverberate with the falls of ice, and so often would great waves rush along their coasts; numerous icebergs, some as tall as cathedrals, and occasionally loaded with "no inconsiderable blocks of rock," would be stranded on the outlying islets; at intervals violent earthquakes would shoot prodigious masses of ice into the waters below.