stratigraphy

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stra·tig·ra·phy

 (strə-tĭg′rə-fē)
n.
The study of rock strata, especially the distribution, deposition, and age of sedimentary rocks.

strat′i·graph′ic (străt′ĭ-grăf′ĭk), strat′i·graph′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
strat′i·graph′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stratigraphy

(strəˈtɪɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Geological Science) the study of the composition, relative positions, etc, of rock strata in order to determine their geological history
2. (Archaeology) archaeol a vertical section through the earth showing the relative positions of the human artefacts and therefore the chronology of successive levels of occupation
Abbreviation: stratig
stratigrapher, stratigraphist n
stratigraphic, ˌstratiˈgraphical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

stra•tig•ra•phy

(strəˈtɪg rə fi)

n.
a branch of geology dealing with the classification, nomenclature, correlation, and interpretation of stratified rocks.
[1860–65]
stra•tig′ra•pher, n.
strat•i•graph•ic (ˌstræt ɪˈgræf ɪk) adj.
strat`i•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

stratigraphy

the branch of geology that studies the classification, correlation, and interpretation of stratified rocks. — stratigrapher, n.stratigraphic, stratigraphical, adj.
See also: Geology
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

stratigraphy

1. The study of the composition and relative positions of rock strata.
2. A section cut vertically in the ground and used, by examining the different layers, to determine the chronology of human artifacts or settlement remains that are found buried.
3. The study of stratified (layered) rocks.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stratigraphy - the branch of geology that studies the arrangement and succession of strata
geology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocks
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

stratigraphy

[strəˈtɪgrəfɪ] Nestratigrafía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The southern Indus basin is a part of complex structural and stratigraphical history.
Papers from other continents most often appeared in topical special issues of the EJES, published as follows: in 2008, issue 2 and partly issue 3--'Georesources and public policy'; in 2009, issue 1--'The Seventh Baltic Stratigraphical Conference' and issue 4--'The International Year of Planet Earth, 2007-2009' (guest editor A.
These dates helped establish the stratigraphical chronology for the site, both in relation to the timeframe for the use of this mortuary space as well as permitting us to cross-reference Toca do Gongo III with other funerary rock-shelters in the region.
The Application of Ichnology to Palaeoenvironmental and Stratigraphical Analysis.
A great deal of stratigraphical information of the provenance of the paper fragments has been collected by the aforementioned Burke.
However, the diversity dynamics and the stratigraphical distribution of this group in the Ibero-Levantine Sector of the Iberian Range require more accurate analysis due to the patchy distribution of the outcrops.
Poster display at American Association of Stratigraphical Palynology 17th Annual Meeting, Arlington, Virginia
The evidence is stratigraphical (including pottery) at Arlingham (Allen 2001) in the inner estuary, and morphostratigraphical in the middle estuary at Littleton (NGR ST 582907) and Woolaston (NGR ST 591981); at Littleton and Woolaston, a faint feature a few centimetres high and a subtle vegetation change separate two high marsh-terraces, each of which overlies pale brown silts below thin grey silts.