stratosphere


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strat·o·sphere

 (străt′ə-sfîr′)
n.
1. The region of the atmosphere above the troposphere and below the mesosphere.
2. An extremely high or the highest point or degree on a ranked scale: business expenses in the stratosphere.

[French stratosphère : Latin strātus, a spreading out; see stratus + -sphère, sphere (from Old French espere; see sphere).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stratosphere

(ˈstrætəˌsfɪə)
n
(Physical Geography) the atmospheric layer lying between the troposphere and the mesosphere, in which temperature generally increases with height
stratospheric, ˌstratoˈspherical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

strat•o•sphere

(ˈstræt əˌsfɪər)

n.
1. the region of the upper atmosphere extending upward from the tropopause to about 30 miles (50 km) above the earth, characterized by little vertical change in temperature.
2. any great height or degree.
[1905–10; < German Stratosphäre (1901); see stratum, -o-, -sphere]
strat`o•spher′ic (-ˈsfɛr ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

strat·o·sphere

(străt′ə-sfîr′)
The layer of the Earth's atmosphere lying above the troposphere and below the mesosphere, from the tropopause to about 31 miles (50 kilometers) above the Earth's surface. In the stratosphere, temperatures rise slightly with altitude.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stratosphere

the upper part of the earth’s atmosphere, characterized by an almost constant temperature throughout its altitude, which begins at about seven miles and continues to the ionosphere, at about 50 miles.
See also: Atmosphere
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

stratosphere

The layer of atmosphere that lies above the tropopause and is about 15.5 mi (25km) thick.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stratosphere - the atmospheric layer between the troposphere and the mesosphere
layer - a relatively thin sheetlike expanse or region lying over or under another
atmosphere - the envelope of gases surrounding any celestial body
ozone layer, ozonosphere - a layer in the stratosphere (at approximately 20 miles) that contains a concentration of ozone sufficient to block most ultraviolet radiation from the sun
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

stratosphere

[ˈstrætəʊsfɪəʳ] Nestratosfera f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

stratosphere

[ˈstrætəsfɪər] nstratosphère f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

stratosphere

nStratosphäre f; to send something into the stratosphere (fig)etw astronomisch ansteigen lassen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

stratosphere

[ˈstrætəʊˌsfɪəʳ] nstratosfera
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, ozone in the upper stratosphere (35 to 45 kilometers above ground) is now declining at about 4 percent per decade, half the 1980s rate.
Scientists reckon that CFC concentrations in the lower atmosphere have fallen as a result of efforts taken to reduce emissions of ozone-depleting gases, but not in the stratosphere. There are some signs that CFC concentrations are stabilising in the stratosphere, but no figures have yet been suggested, according to Michael Profitt, a scientist working for the WMO.
'A small amount of the culprit virus introduced into the stratosphere could make a first tentative fall out east of the great mountain range of the Himalayas, where the stratosphere is thinnest, followed by sporadic deposits in neighbouring areas,' they wrote.
But this year a low temperature area in the stratosphere above Antarctica is expanding, which is conducive to increasing damage to the ozone layer.
Scientists have known for some time that ozone lows are often associated with extremely low temperatures in the stratosphere and the presence of polar stratospheric clouds, which provide the template for the chemical reactions that destroy ozone.
and Stratosphere's Carl Icahn -- will be personally involved with the producers of films acquired by their companies and released through IDP.
Aircraft emissions in the stratosphere -- 731 miles (11-50 kilometers) above Earth -- destroy ozone when nitrogen oxides are exposed to ultraviolet radiation from the sun.
Ray went on to insist that there was little likelihood that freons (chlorofluoro-carbons, or CFCs for short) would reach the stratosphere. She pointed out that CFCs are very heavy molecules compared to other gases in the atmosphere, and she was quite right.
Because they are several times heavier than air, these naysayers claim that CFCs cannot rise into the stratosphere. It is true that CFCs are much heavier than air; however, winds efficiently mix atmospheric gases both across latitudes and vertically.
It is a part of the planet's stratosphere which has a relatively high concentration of ozone particles, about 10 per million (compared to 0.3 parts per million on average throughout Earth's atmosphere).
Thus, the team concludes in the August 3rd Nature that WASP-121b has a stratosphere. That result implies it has some sort of ozone-mimicking compound in its upper atmosphere, perhaps vanadium oxide (VO), although the team couldn't determine whether VO is present.

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