strifeful

strifeful

(ˈstraɪffʊl)
adj
full of strife
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, the texts refer to the world situation--not all that surprising in that the books are all from the strifeful mid-1930s to the mid-1940s--and some books detail experiences to which servicemen might easily and poignantly relate.
'How Sin Evolves': The medieval catalogue of character defects/was meant to drag man's dialogue up near where God expects,/until America's analogue brought home the sin's effects.//The sloth proves neither strifeful brute, nor sanguine, but sincere./The problem of so slow a life is simply being here./Since sleep can make the stay more brief, the less there needs to fear.//So blessed be sloth, the mossy beast, who's camouflaged in grace,/that even when he's shot beneath, his claws hold him in place;/his vision upwards thus bequeaths suspension of god's face.
For instance, while discussing Delius's A Village Romeo and Juliet, Mellers states: "The strifeful key of C minor takes over, and the orchestra quivers in augmented fifths that sound like lacrimae rerum" (p.