strikebreaking


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strike·break·er

 (strīk′brā′kər)
n.
One who works or provides an employer with workers during a strike.

strike′break′ing n.

strike•break•ing

(ˈstraɪkˌbreɪ kɪŋ)

n.
action directed at breaking up a strike of workers.
[1915–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.strikebreaking - confrontational activities intended to break up a strike by workers
opposition, confrontation - the act of hostile groups opposing each other; "the government was not ready for a confrontation with the unions"; "the invaders encountered stiff opposition"
Translations

strikebreaking

[ˈstraɪkˌbreɪkɪŋ] n he was accused of strikebreakingl'hanno tacciato di crumiraggio
References in periodicals archive ?
A larger portion of the public formed crowds that physically and verbally inhibited strikebreaking operations and turned the streets into sites of both fun and danger.
If we assign these arbitrary grades, we damage the academic integrity of our teaching, and we aid and abet the strikebreaking acts of the administration.
Inside 79 the gates, outlined against a shimmering morning sea,the cranes bowed and lifted, bowed and lifted, filling yet more trucks with strikebreaking coal.
116) To be sure, the results may have been different had the court considered the goals of exerting pressure on the employer or preventing strikebreaking as well.
It fascinates me how people's impressions of him differ depending on whether they knew him as writer, teacher, strikebreaking administrator, or senator.
Thus, legal claims are by no means uncomplicated; moreover, US history is replete with shameful episodes carried out under color of law: slavery and segregation, strikebreaking, the denial of woman's suffrage and reproductive rights, as well as gay rights.
The drivers' union has warned Virgin bosses against bringing in strikebreaking managers in the event of TSSA staff, including controllers in charge of train movements, voting for walkouts during the Olympics.
Here 'mateship' was deified as the salvation of the working man; conversely, the figure of the strikebreaking 'scab' was reviled like no other.
Mark Serwotka, general secretary of the 300,000-strong Public and Commercial Services union, said: "The Government should be trying to settle this dispute rather than wasting taxpayers' money on strikebreaking.
Strikebreaking was made illegal by a Labour gover nment in the 70s.
Yesterday, David Cameron controversially praised strikebreaking teachers in England.