strikingly


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strik·ing

 (strī′kĭng)
adj.
Arresting the attention and producing a vivid impression on the sight or the mind. See Synonyms at noticeable.

strik′ing·ly adv.
strik′ing·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.strikingly - in a striking manner; "this was strikingly demonstrated"; "the evidence was strikingly absent"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
بصورةٍ مُدْهِشَه
pozoruhodně
iøjefaldende
á eftirtektarverîan hátt
göze çarpacak şekilde

strikingly

[ˈstraɪkɪŋlɪ] ADV [similar, different, bold] → sorprendentemente; [attractive] → extraordinariamente
a strikingly attractive womanuna mujer extraordinariamente atractiva, una mujer imponente
to contrast strikingly with sthcontrastar notablemente con algo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

strikingly

[ˈstraɪkɪŋli] adv
(= markedly) to be strikingly similar → présenter une ressemblance frappante
to be strikingly different → présenter des différences frappantes
a strikingly handsome man → un homme dont la beauté attire l'œil
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

strikingly

adv similar, evident, boldauffallend; differentunübersehbar; attractivebemerkenswert; modernverblüffend; demonstrateunmissverständlich; contrastdeutlich; more strikingly, …was noch mehr ins Auge fällt ist, dass …
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

strikingly

[ˈstraɪkɪŋlɪ] adv (different, original) → totalmente; (pretty, handsome) → straordinariamente
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

strike

(straik) past tense struck (strak) : past participles struck ~stricken (ˈstrikən) verb
1. to hit, knock or give a blow to. He struck me in the face with his fist; Why did you strike him?; The stone struck me a blow on the side of the head; His head struck the table as he fell; The tower of the church was struck by lightning.
2. to attack. The enemy troops struck at dawn; We must prevent the disease striking again.
3. to produce (sparks or a flame) by rubbing. He struck a match/light; He struck sparks from the stone with his knife.
4. (of workers) to stop work as a protest, or in order to force employers to give better pay. The men decided to strike for higher wages.
5. to discover or find. After months of prospecting they finally struck gold/oil; If we walk in this direction we may strike the right path.
6. to (make something) sound. He struck a note on the piano/violin; The clock struck twelve.
7. to impress, or give a particular impression to (a person). I was struck by the resemblance between the two men; How does the plan strike you?; It / The thought struck me that she had come to borrow money.
8. to mint or manufacture (a coin, medal etc).
9. to go in a certain direction. He left the path and struck (off) across the fields.
10. to lower or take down (tents, flags etc).
noun
1. an act of striking. a miners' strike.
2. a discovery of oil, gold etc. He made a lucky strike.
ˈstriker noun
1. a worker who strikes.
2. in football, a forward player.
ˈstriking adjective
noticeable or impressive. She is tall and striking; She wears striking clothes.
ˈstrikingly adverb
be (out) on strike
(of workers) to be striking. The electricity workers are (out) on strike.
call a strike
(of a trade union leader etc) to ask workers to strike.
come out on strike
(of workers) to strike.
come/be within striking distance of
to come very close to.
strike at
to attempt to strike, or aim a blow at (a person etc). He struck at the dog with his stick.
strike an attitude / a pose
to place oneself in a particular usually rather showy pose.
strike a balance
to reach a satisfactory middle level of compromise between two undesirable extremes.
strike a bargain/agreement
to make a bargain; to reach an agreement.
strike a blow for
to make an effort on behalf of (a cause etc).
strike down
to hit or knock (a person) down. He was struck down by a car / a terrible disease.
strike dumb
to amaze. I was struck dumb at the news.
strike fear/terror etc into
to fill (a person) with fear etc. The sound struck terror into them.
strike home
(of a blow, insult etc) to reach the place where it will hurt most.
strike it rich
to make a lot of money.
strike lucky
to have good luck in a particular matter.
strike out
1. to erase or cross out (a word etc). He read the essay and struck out a word here and there.
2. to start fighting. He's a man who strikes out with his fists whenever he's angry.
strike up
1. to begin to play a tune etc. The band struck up (with) `The Red Flag'.
2. to begin (a friendship, conversation etc). He struck up an acquaintance with a girl on the train.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Their eyes were close together and non-protruding; their ears were high set, but more laterally located than those of the Martians, while their snouts and teeth were strikingly like those of our African gorilla.
She seemed strikingly homely, standing there in the afternoon light.
The effect of different modes of life upon the human frame and human character is strikingly instanced in the contrast between the hunting Indians of the prairies, and the piscatory Indians of the sea-coast.
The length of her body was strikingly out of proportion to her short legs.
The picture was strikingly beautiful; it was the very scene itself, transferred as if by magic to the canvas; but I expressed my approbation in guarded terms, and few words, for fear of displeasing her.
Perhaps his imperturbable character was never more strikingly developed, for he preserved his usual equable smile notwithstanding that his body was dangling in a most uncomfortable position, all loose and limp and shapeless, while his long peaked cap, unequally balanced against his exceedingly slight legs, threatened every instant to bring him toppling down.
This character --which showed itself so strikingly in everything about him, and the effect of which we seek to convey to the reader--went no deeper than his station, habits of life, and external circumstances.
"All that, my dear friend, is strikingly true," replied Athos.
A multitude of small considerations in connection with this subject--trifling enough in themselves, but strikingly important when massed together--had latterly led my mind to a conclusion which I resolved to verify.
-- that my own features were partly repeated in her face, and so strikingly that the world might see them!
Her forehead had been strikingly expressive of an engrossing terror and compassion that saw nothing but the peril of the accused.
Though more than sixty years had elapsed since the pilgrims came, this crowd of their descendants still showed the strong and sombre features of their character perhaps more strikingly in such a stern emergency than on happier occasions.