stringency


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strin·gent

 (strĭn′jənt)
adj.
1. Imposing rigorous standards of performance; severe: stringent safety measures.
2. Constricted; tight: operating under a stringent time limit.
3. Characterized by scarcity of money, credit restrictions, or other financial strain: stringent economic policies.

[Latin stringēns, stringent-, present participle of stringere, to draw tight; see streig- in Indo-European roots.]

strin′gen·cy n.
strin′gent·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stringency - a state occasioned by scarcity of money and a shortage of credit
deficiency, lack, want - the state of needing something that is absent or unavailable; "there is a serious lack of insight into the problem"; "water is the critical deficiency in desert regions"; "for want of a nail the shoe was lost"
2.stringency - conscientious attention to rules and details
painstakingness, conscientiousness - the trait of being painstaking and careful

stringency

noun
The fact or condition of being rigorous and unsparing:
Translations
صَرامَه، تَشَدَّدصُعوبَة الحُصول على قُروض
nedostatekpřísnostúsporný
knaphedstrenghed
pénztelenség
harkaòrengingar; sparnaîar-
para sıkılığı/darlığısertliksıkılık

stringency

[ˈstrɪndʒənsɪ] N
1. [of regulations, controls, standards] → rigor m, severidad f
2. (Fin) → tirantez f, dificultad f
economic stringencysituación f económica apurada, estrechez f

stringency

n (of standards, law, reforms, discipline)Strenge f; (of rules, testing, training etc also)Härte f; (of measures)Härte f, → Schärfe f; economic stringencystrenge Sparmaßnahmen pl

stringency

[ˈstrɪndʒnsɪ] nrigore m

string

(striŋ) noun
1. (a piece of) long narrow cord made of threads twisted together, or tape, for tying, fastening etc. a piece of string to tie a parcel; a ball of string; a puppet's strings; apron-strings.
2. a fibre etc, eg on a vegetable.
3. a piece of wire, gut etc on a musical instrument, eg a violin. His A-string broke; (also adjective) He plays the viola in a string orchestra.
4. a series or group of things threaded on a cord etc. a string of beads.
verbpast tense, past participle strung (straŋ)
1. to put (beads etc) on a string etc. The pearls were sent to a jeweller to be strung.
2. to put a string or strings on (eg a bow or stringed instrument). The archer strung his bow and aimed an arrow at the target.
3. to remove strings from (vegetables etc).
4. to tie and hang with string etc. The farmer strung up the dead crows on the fence.
strings noun plural
(in an orchestra, the group of people who play) stringed instruments, ie violins, violas, 'cellos and double basses. The conductor said the strings were too loud.
ˈstringy adjective
(especially of meat or vegetables) having a lot of tough fibres.
ˈstringiness noun
string bean
the long, edible green or yellow pod of certain beans.
stringed instruments
musical instruments that have strings eg violins, guitars etc.
have (someone) on a string
to have (a person) under one's control.
pull strings
to use one's influence or that of others to gain an advantage.
pull the strings
to be the person who is really, though usually not apparently, controlling the actions of others.
string out
to stretch into a long line. The runners were strung out along the course.
strung up
very nervous.
stringent (ˈstrindʒənt) adjective
(of rules etc) very strict, or strongly enforced. There should be much more stringent laws against the dropping of rubbish in the streets.
ˈstringently adverb
ˈstringency noun
1. the quality of being strict.
2. scarcity of money for lending etc. in times of stringency; (also adjective) The government are demanding stringency measures.
References in classic literature ?
At first it had seemed that he wished to keep even her aloof from any close knowledge of what he was doing; but gradually the terrible stringency of human need--the prospect of a too speedy death--
Tenders are invited for evaluation of the special stringency directive in the context of the support of the european social fund (esf) in the free state of thuringia during the funding period 2014 to 2020
The stringency of emission norms is different for different categories even within the same mandated emission level.
The rule announced on August 16 significantly increases engine stringency levels for over-the-road segments and for vocational applications.
I did have some encouragement from the Cabinet member that funds might be found in the County Council to deal with this, but, no doubt owing to financial stringency, this has come to nothing.
Building policy scores were based on five metrics: stringency of residential and commercial building codes, energy code compliance efforts, energy saving targets, incentives and financing for efficient buildings, benchmarking requirements, and availability of efficiency service programs and providers.
This paper presents an innovative methodology based on stringency matrixes, as a decision algorithm, that improves the current selection method for structural materials used in the reactor pressure vessels (RPV) manufacturing.
The standards released in 2010 increase the stringency of the existing minimum conservation standards for these three types of residential heating products, which account for about 18 percent of energy use in homes across the country.
We appreciate that the city council is facing a time of financial stringency but investment in reducing air pollution should save money as well as lives in the long term.
The company validated seven biomarkers at high stringency after taking 508 highly curated disease and control samples.
The ministry added that it would be dealing with the scandal in the utmost transparency and stringency.
The scope and stringency of NF Validation, requiring an extensive validation study as well as a multi-lab ring trial, demonstrates the method's robustness and accuracy.