stringency


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strin·gent

 (strĭn′jənt)
adj.
1. Imposing rigorous standards of performance; severe: stringent safety measures.
2. Constricted; tight: operating under a stringent time limit.
3. Characterized by scarcity of money, credit restrictions, or other financial strain: stringent economic policies.

[Latin stringēns, stringent-, present participle of stringere, to draw tight; see streig- in Indo-European roots.]

strin′gen·cy n.
strin′gent·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stringency - a state occasioned by scarcity of money and a shortage of credit
deficiency, lack, want - the state of needing something that is absent or unavailable; "there is a serious lack of insight into the problem"; "water is the critical deficiency in desert regions"; "for want of a nail the shoe was lost"
2.stringency - conscientious attention to rules and details
painstakingness, conscientiousness - the trait of being painstaking and careful

stringency

noun
The fact or condition of being rigorous and unsparing:
Translations
صَرامَه، تَشَدَّدصُعوبَة الحُصول على قُروض
nedostatekpřísnostúsporný
knaphedstrenghed
pénztelenség
harkaòrengingar; sparnaîar-
para sıkılığı/darlığısertliksıkılık

stringency

[ˈstrɪndʒənsɪ] N
1. [of regulations, controls, standards] → rigor m, severidad f
2. (Fin) → tirantez f, dificultad f
economic stringencysituación f económica apurada, estrechez f

stringency

n (of standards, law, reforms, discipline)Strenge f; (of rules, testing, training etc also)Härte f; (of measures)Härte f, → Schärfe f; economic stringencystrenge Sparmaßnahmen pl

stringency

[ˈstrɪndʒnsɪ] nrigore m

string

(striŋ) noun
1. (a piece of) long narrow cord made of threads twisted together, or tape, for tying, fastening etc. a piece of string to tie a parcel; a ball of string; a puppet's strings; apron-strings.
2. a fibre etc, eg on a vegetable.
3. a piece of wire, gut etc on a musical instrument, eg a violin. His A-string broke; (also adjective) He plays the viola in a string orchestra.
4. a series or group of things threaded on a cord etc. a string of beads.
verbpast tense, past participle strung (straŋ)
1. to put (beads etc) on a string etc. The pearls were sent to a jeweller to be strung.
2. to put a string or strings on (eg a bow or stringed instrument). The archer strung his bow and aimed an arrow at the target.
3. to remove strings from (vegetables etc).
4. to tie and hang with string etc. The farmer strung up the dead crows on the fence.
strings noun plural
(in an orchestra, the group of people who play) stringed instruments, ie violins, violas, 'cellos and double basses. The conductor said the strings were too loud.
ˈstringy adjective
(especially of meat or vegetables) having a lot of tough fibres.
ˈstringiness noun
string bean
the long, edible green or yellow pod of certain beans.
stringed instruments
musical instruments that have strings eg violins, guitars etc.
have (someone) on a string
to have (a person) under one's control.
pull strings
to use one's influence or that of others to gain an advantage.
pull the strings
to be the person who is really, though usually not apparently, controlling the actions of others.
string out
to stretch into a long line. The runners were strung out along the course.
strung up
very nervous.
stringent (ˈstrindʒənt) adjective
(of rules etc) very strict, or strongly enforced. There should be much more stringent laws against the dropping of rubbish in the streets.
ˈstringently adverb
ˈstringency noun
1. the quality of being strict.
2. scarcity of money for lending etc. in times of stringency; (also adjective) The government are demanding stringency measures.
References in classic literature ?
At first it had seemed that he wished to keep even her aloof from any close knowledge of what he was doing; but gradually the terrible stringency of human need--the prospect of a too speedy death--
These patients of highly fatal diseases cannot be placed at separate places from other prisoners due to financial stringency and these diseases can spread to healthy prisoners.
Stringency in government protocols for impeccable catheter securement amongst patients further necessitate adoption of catheter stabilization devices allowing lucrative growth possibilities.
[USPRwire, Tue Dec 11 2018] Chemical control systems are witnessing higher adoption in chemical and allied sectors, owing to a multitude of factors that include stringency in government regulations, industrial automation, and focus on operational efficiency.
The demand for rheometers and viscometers across key markets is driven by factors such as technology advancements; expansion of petrochemical and material manufacturing industries; growing stringency of the regulatory framework for product safety compliance in cosmeceutical, biotechnology, and pharmaceutical industries; rising public-private investments to support product innovation; and increasing burden of target diseases, globally.
He said, 'Currently, some aspects of our regulatory regime-liquidity regulation, for example-treat banks with more than USD250bn in assets with the same stringency as G-SIBs.
The Kuwaiti minister drew a correlation between more stringency in environmental laws and increased job opportunities, saying that an employment boom is possible in the renewable energy sector alone.
The key recommendations include: (a) uncoupling admission to the Bar from the completion of a practice training contract; (b) lengthening the practice training period from six months to one year; and (c) raising the standard and stringency of Part B of the Singapore Bar Examinations.
The publisher can even customise the stringency of the assessment for different journals, paper types, or stage of publication cycle.' www.editage.com
The suggestions put forth by PDA were not welcomed by dairy stakeholders, who showed their stringency in this regard.
He describes the size, social class, religion, and politics of the Orthodox Jewish population in the US; family aspects, including marriage, divorce, sex, and homosexuality; changes in the 20th century; the adoption of religious stringency; tensions within modern orthodoxy; and changes in the interpretation of beliefs and the revival of the Bible.
The stringency of emission norms is different for different categories even within the same mandated emission level.