stringing


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Related to stringing: stringing along

string

 (strĭng)
n.
1.
a. Material made of drawn-out, twisted fiber, used for fastening, tying, or lacing.
b. A strand or cord of such material.
2. Music
a. A cord stretched on an instrument and struck, plucked, or bowed to produce tones.
b. strings The section of a band or orchestra composed of stringed instruments, especially violins, violas, cellos, and double basses.
c. strings Stringed instruments or their players considered as a group.
3. Something resembling a string or appearing as a long, thin line: limp strings of hair.
4. A plant fiber.
5. Physics One of the extremely minute objects that form the basis of string theory.
6.
a. A set of objects threaded together or attached on a string: a string of beads.
b. A number of objects arranged in a line: a string of islands.
c. Computers A set of consecutive characters.
7. A series of similar or related acts, events, or items: a string of victories. See Synonyms at series.
8.
a. A set of animals, especially racehorses, belonging to a single owner; a stable.
b. A scattered group of businesses under a single ownership or management: a string of boutiques.
9. Sports
a. A group of players ranked according to ability within a team: He made the second string.
b. A complete game consisting of ten frames in bowling.
10. Architecture
a. A stringboard.
b. A stringcourse.
11. Games The balk line in billiards.
12. Informal A limiting or hidden condition. Often used in the plural: a gift with no strings attached.
v. strung (strŭng), string·ing, strings
v.tr.
1. To fit or furnish with strings or a string: string a guitar; string a tennis racket.
2. To stretch out or extend: string a wire across a room.
3. To thread on a string: string popcorn.
4. To arrange in a line or series: strung the words into a sentence.
5. To fasten, tie, or hang with a string or strings: string a hammock between trees.
6. To strip (vegetables) of fibers.
v.intr.
To extend or progress in a string, line, or succession: "We followed the others stringing through the narrow paved paths" (Susan Richards Shreve).
Phrasal Verbs:
string along Informal
1. To go along with something; agree.
2. To keep (someone) waiting or in a state of uncertainty.
3. To fool, cheat, or deceive.
string out
To draw out; prolong.
string up Informal
To kill (someone) by hanging.
Idiom:
on a/the string
Under one's complete control or influence.

[Middle English, from Old English streng.]

Stringing

 string collectively, 1722.
Translations

stringing

[ˈstrɪŋɪŋ] n (Tennis) → accordatura
References in classic literature ?
So a judgmatical rap over the head stiffened the lying impostor for a time, and leaving him a bit of walnut for his supper, to prevent an uproar, and stringing him up atween two saplings, I made free with his finery, and took the part of the bear on myself, in order that the operations might proceed.
Hepzibah blundered to and fro about her small place of business, committing the most unheard-of errors: now stringing up twelve, and now seven, tallow-candles, instead of ten to the pound; selling ginger for Scotch snuff, pins for needles, and needles for pins; misreckoning her change, sometimes to the public detriment, and much oftener to her own; and thus she went on, doing her utmost to bring chaos back again, until, at the close of the day's labor, to her inexplicable astonishment, she found the money-drawer almost destitute of coin.
They were stringing ground wires; we were afraid to put up poles, for they would attract too much inquiry.