striped marlin


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

striped marlin

n.
A marlin (Tetrapturus audax) of the Pacific and Indian Oceans, marked with vertical stripes along the sides.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.striped marlin - Pacific food and game fish marked with dark blue vertical stripesstriped marlin - Pacific food and game fish marked with dark blue vertical stripes
marlin - large long-jawed oceanic sport fishes; related to sailfishes and spearfishes; not completely cold-blooded i.e. able to warm their brains and eyes
References in periodicals archive ?
Striped marlin, which run 125 to 150 pounds, are the mainstay of the Cabo waters and East Cape fishing grounds.
White and striped marlin are more likely to be caught on natural baits with longer drop-back durations and are more likely to be deep-hooked (Horodysky and Graves, 2005).
Are not the white marlin, the striped marlin, and the black marlin all sexual and age variations of the same fish?
Today, striped marlin are the primary target of sportfishermen as many knowledgeable anglers consider the area to be the best place anywhere to catch one.
Von Bertalanffy growth-curves for striped marlin, Tetrapturus audax, and blue marlin, Makaira nigricans, in Central North Pacific Ocean.
He caught a Pacific blue marlin in Mauritius in 1999, a white marlin in the Azores in September 2001, a striped marlin in 2000 in Kenya, a black marlin in Mozambique in 2003, a swordfish in 2000 in Kenya, a shortbill spearfish in Mauritius in 1996 and a longbill spearfish in 1997 in Madeira.
It means a striped marlin is after the hook-less artificial bait trolled behind the Shogun, a 92-foot long-range sport fishing boat.
Striped marlin were the real target as Jason and Bob Marshall started to fish about a mile from shore in an 18ft open boat.
The proportion of blue marlin in the catch was higher than that of striped marlin, Tetrapturus audax, in the early 1950's but striped marlin became more predominant from the early 1960's to the present (Fig.
Catch rates for apex predators such as blue shark (Prionace glauca), bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and albacore (Thunnus alalunga) tunas, shortbill spearfish (Tetrapturus angustirostris), and striped marlin (Tetrapturus audax) declined by 3% to 9% per year and catch rates for four midtrophic species, mahimahi (Coryphaena hippurus), sickle pomfret (Taractichthys steindachneri), escolar (Lepidocybium flavobrunneum), and snake mackerel (Gempylus serpens), increased by 6% to 18% per year.
Probably more striped marlin are caught near Cabo than anywhere else.