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stripe 1

a. A long narrow band distinguished, as by color or texture, from the surrounding material or surface.
b. A textile pattern of parallel bands or lines on a contrasting background.
c. A fabric having such a pattern.
2. A strip of cloth or braid worn on a uniform to indicate rank, awards received, or length of service; a chevron.
3. Sort; kind: "All Fascists are not of one mind, one stripe" (Lillian Hellman).
tr.v. striped, strip·ing, stripes
To mark with stripes or a stripe.

[Middle English, possibly from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German strīpe.]

stripe 2

n. Archaic
A stroke or blow, as with a whip.

[Middle English.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stripes - V-shaped sleeve badge indicating military rank and servicestripes - V-shaped sleeve badge indicating military rank and service; "they earned their stripes in Kuwait"
badge - an emblem (a small piece of plastic or cloth or metal) that signifies your status (rank or membership or affiliation etc.); "they checked everyone's badge before letting them in"
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
References in classic literature ?
A third colored the post with stripes of a dark red paint; all which indications of a hostile design in the leaders of the nation were received by the men without in a gloomy and ominous silence.
From the loftiest point of its roof, during precisely three and a half hours of each forenoon, floats or droops, in breeze or calm, the banner of the republic; but with the thirteen stripes turned vertically, instead of horizontally, and thus indicating that a civil, and not a military, post of Uncle Sam's government is here established.
The La Belle Riviere, as brave and beautiful a boat as ever walked the waters of her namesake river, was floating gayly down the stream, under a brilliant sky, the stripes and stars of free America waving and fluttering over head; the guards crowded with well-dressed ladies and gentlemen walking and enjoying the delightful day.
Take him hence and give him a few stripes whereby to teach him how to treat the servant of a nobleman after a different fashion another time.
He had given Demby but few stripes, when, to get rid of the scourging, he ran and plunged himself into a creek, and stood there at the depth of his shoulders, refusing to come out.
My stripes were sore and stiff, and made me cry afresh, when I moved; but they were nothing to the guilt I felt.
Warr hath determin'd us, and foild with loss Irreparable; tearms of peace yet none Voutsaf't or sought; for what peace will be giv'n To us enslav'd, but custody severe, And stripes, and arbitrary punishment Inflicted?
Finally the landlady dressed up the curate in a style that left nothing to be desired; she put on him a cloth petticoat with black velvet stripes a palm broad, all slashed, and a bodice of green velvet set off by a binding of white satin, which as well as the petticoat must have been made in the time of king Wamba.
And when we are punished by her, whether with imprisonment or stripes, the punishment is to be endured in silence; and if she lead us to wounds or death in battle, thither we follow as is right; neither may any one yield or retreat or leave his rank, but whether in battle or in a court of law, or in any other place, he must do what his city and his country order him; or he must change their view of what is just: and if he may do no violence to his father or mother, much less may he do violence to his country.
A coarse woollen petticoat in black and gray stripes, too short by several inches, exposed her legs.
Its reception into the Union was a precedent which may have far-reaching effects hereafter, when the Pole and the Tropics may hold alliance to the Stars and Stripes.
Priests were passing in processions, beating their dreary tambourines; police and custom-house officers with pointed hats encrusted with lac and carrying two sabres hung to their waists; soldiers, clad in blue cotton with white stripes, and bearing guns; the Mikado's guards, enveloped in silken doubles, hauberks and coats of mail; and numbers of military folk of all ranks--for the military profession is as much respected in Japan as it is despised in China--went hither and thither in groups and pairs.