stripes


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stripe 1

 (strīp)
n.
1.
a. A long narrow band distinguished, as by color or texture, from the surrounding material or surface.
b. A textile pattern of parallel bands or lines on a contrasting background.
c. A fabric having such a pattern.
2. A strip of cloth or braid worn on a uniform to indicate rank, awards received, or length of service; a chevron.
3. Sort; kind: "All Fascists are not of one mind, one stripe" (Lillian Hellman).
tr.v. striped, strip·ing, stripes
To mark with stripes or a stripe.

[Middle English, possibly from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German strīpe.]

stripe 2

 (strīp)
n. Archaic
A stroke or blow, as with a whip.

[Middle English.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stripes - V-shaped sleeve badge indicating military rank and servicestripes - V-shaped sleeve badge indicating military rank and service; "they earned their stripes in Kuwait"
badge - an emblem (a small piece of plastic or cloth or metal) that signifies your status (rank or membership or affiliation etc.); "they checked everyone's badge before letting them in"
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
References in classic literature ?
In the north-west part of India the Kattywar breed of horses is so generally striped, that, as I hear from Colonel Poole, who examined the breed for the Indian Government, a horse without stripes is not considered as purely-bred.
'I have three tiresome beasts here,' said the other; 'if you will take them, give them food and room, and treat them as I tell you, I will pay you whatever you ask.' 'With all my heart,' said the miller; 'but how shall I treat them?' Then the huntsman said, 'Give the old one stripes three times a day and hay once; give the next (who was the servant-maid) stripes once a day and hay three times; and give the youngest (who was the beautiful lady) hay three times a day and no stripes': for he could not find it in his heart to have her beaten.
"Then the First of the Tigers answered, 'I am content'; but when next he drank he saw the black stripes upon his flank and his side, and he remembered the name that the Hairless One had given him, and he was angry.
"Wherefore, bind the heathen crew, and bestow on them a small matter of stripes apiece, as earnest of our future justice.
It would require a pretty good scholar in arithmetic to tell how many stripes he had inflicted, and how many birch rods he had worn out, during all that time, in his fatherly tenderness for his pupils.
The penalty was State imprisonment, the stripes and the lockstep.
"The handkerchief is a large one, blue with red stripes and the cap is an old Basque cap, like the one you are wearing now."
Two broad stripes of tattooing, diverging from the centre of his shaven crown, obliquely crossed both eyes--staining the lids--to a little below each ear, where they united with another stripe which swept in a straight line along the lips and formed the base of the triangle.
"No, certainly not," said Merlin; "here, this minute, and on the spot, the matter must be settled; either Dulcinea will return to the cave of Montesinos and to her former condition of peasant wench, or else in her present form shall be carried to the Elysian fields, where she will remain waiting until the number of stripes is completed."
The other was a great Tiger with purple stripes around his lithe body, powerful limbs, and eyes that showed through the half closed lids like coals of fire.
I made them of the nicest rags, and braided them in stripes. It was such company these last few winters.
Indeed it is as much the business of the legislator as anything else, to banish every indecent expression out of the state: for from a permission to speak whatever is shameful, very quickly arises the doing it, and this particularly with young people: for which reason let them never speak nor hear any such thing: but if it appears that any freeman has done or said anything that is forbidden before he is of age to be thought fit to partake of the common meals, let him be punished by disgrace and stripes; but if a person above that age does so, let him be treated as you would a slave, on account of his being infamous.