stripped


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strip 1

 (strĭp)
v. stripped, strip·ping, strips
v.tr.
1.
a. To remove clothing or covering from: stripped the beds.
b. To remove or take off (clothing or covering): stripped off his shirt.
c. To remove an exterior coating, as of paint or varnish, from: stripped the cabinets.
d. To remove the leaves from the stalks of (tobacco, for example).
e. To clear of a natural covering or growth; make bare: strip a field.
2.
a. To deprive of possessions, office, rank, privileges, or honors; divest: The court stripped him of his property.
b. To rob of wealth or property; plunder or despoil: stripped the palace of its treasures.
3.
a. To remove equipment, furnishings, or accessories from: They stripped down the car to reduce its weight.
b. To remove nonessential detail from; reduce to essentials: The director stripped down her style of filmmaking.
c. To dismantle (a firearm, for example) piece by piece.
4. To damage or break the threads of (a screw, for example) or the teeth of (a gear).
5.
a. To draw and discard the first drops of milk from the udder of (a cow or goat, for example) at the start of milking.
b. To draw the last drops of milk from the udder of (a cow or goat, for example) at the end of milking.
6. To extract the milt or roe from (a live fish).
7. To draw in (a fishing line) by hand, as between casts with a fly rod.
8. To mount (a photographic positive or negative) on paper to be used in making a printing plate.
v.intr.
1.
a. To undress completely.
b. To perform a striptease.
2. To fall away or be removed; peel: The wallpaper strips away easily.
n.
A striptease.

[Middle English stripen, from Old English -strȳpan, to plunder (in bestrȳpan).]

strip′pa·ble adj.

strip 2

 (strĭp)
n.
1.
a. A long narrow piece, usually of uniform width: a strip of paper; strips of beef.
b. A long narrow region of land or body of water.
2. A comic strip.
3. An airstrip.
4. An area, as along a busy street or highway, that is lined with a great number and variety of commercial establishments.
tr.v. stripped, strip·ping, strips
To cut or tear into strips.

[Middle English, perhaps from Middle Low German strippe, strap, thong.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.stripped - having only essential or minimal features; "a stripped new car"; "a stripped-down budget"
minimal, minimum - the least possible; "needed to enforce minimal standards"; "her grades were minimal"; "minimum wage"; "a minimal charge for the service"
2.stripped - having everything extraneous removed including contentsstripped - having everything extraneous removed including contents; "the bare walls"; "the cupboard was bare"
empty - holding or containing nothing; "an empty glass"; "an empty room"; "full of empty seats"; "empty hours"
3.stripped - with clothing stripped off
unclothed - not wearing clothing
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
The exterior green bark being pulled off as worthless, there remains a slender fibrous substance, which is carefully stripped from the stick, to which it closely adheres.
When first severed, the head is dropped astern and held there by a cable till the body is stripped. That done, if it belong to a small whale it is hoisted on deck to be deliberately disposed of.
When, after a time, he removed the pigeon and stripped from it the scorched wrappings of leaves, it gave forth a scent so savoury as to prick up Jerry's ears and set his nostrils to quivering.
But Athena sprang quickly from the immortal head and stood before Zeus who holds the aegis, shaking a sharp spear: great Olympus began to reel horribly at the might of the bright-eyed goddess, and earth round about cried fearfully, and the sea was moved and tossed with dark waves, while foam burst forth suddenly: the bright Son of Hyperion stopped his swift-footed horses a long while, until the maiden Pallas Athene had stripped the heavenly armour from her immortal shoulders.