stroboscopic


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stro·bo·scope

 (strō′bə-skōp′)
n.
Any of various instruments used to observe moving objects by making them appear stationary, especially with pulsed illumination or mechanical devices that intermittently interrupt observation.

[Greek strobos, a whirling; see streb(h)- in Indo-European roots + -scope.]

stro′bo·scop′ic (-skŏp′ĭk) adj.
stro′bo·scop′i·cal·ly adv.
Translations

stroboscopic

References in periodicals archive ?
nextScan's proprietary LuminTec Stroboscopic LED light line technology, freezes the motion of the film and creates archival quality images while allowing for a top speed of over 300 pages per minute (PPM).
Stroboscopic frames were analyzed for the presence of one or more types of abnormal MTP.
Developed by German physician Max Joseph Oertel in 1878, stroboscopic light examination allows routine, slow motion evaluation of the mucosal cover layer of the leading edge of the vocal fold.
Stroboscopic or strobe light was used to elicit the potential for the first clinical VEPs but work by Regan et al showed that the visual cortex responds better to more structured stimuli with edges rather than diffuse stimuli and paved the way for the use of patterned stimuli.
LED lamps went rapidly on and off, accompanied by hard stereophonic sounds of clicking, thus evoking a disorienting stroboscopic effect.
When the hammer fell on a standard fixed-sight early Military & Police, the hammer spur blotted out the rear sight, creating an almost stroboscopic effect on the person aiming and firing rapidly.
If an object is moving across an occupant's gaze, a stroboscopic effect can create hazards, especially in industrial settings.
Diagnostic value of stroboscopic examination in hoarse patients.
Unilux, a leader in stroboscopic inspection lighting, offers 57 different models of stroboscopic inspection lights, including several designed specifically for narrow web applications on presses and slitter/rewinders.
Viscoelastic properties of the human tympanic membrane studied with stroboscopic holography and finite element modelling, Hear.
The threshold action is necessarily stroboscopic, as the threshold condition can be checked only at finite intervals.