strong point


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strong point

n
something at which one excels; forte: tactfulness was never his strong point.

strong point

A key point in a defensive position, usually strongly fortified and heavily armed with automatic weapons, around which other positions are grouped for its protection.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.strong point - an asset of special worth or utilitystrong point - an asset of special worth or utility; "cooking is his forte"
asset, plus - a useful or valuable quality
green fingers, green thumb - a special ability to make plants grow
weak point - an attribute that is inadequate or deficient

strong point

noun forte, strength, speciality, advantage, asset, strong suit, métier, long suit (informal) Discretion is not his strong point.

strong point

noun
Something at which a person excels:
Slang: bag, thing.
Translations
مَهارَه، نُقْطَة قُوَّه
silná stránka
talent
erõs oldala
styrkur, sterka hliî
silná stránka
güçlü nokta

strong

(stroŋ) adjective
1. firm, sound, or powerful, and therefore not easily broken, destroyed, attacked, defeated, resisted, or affected by weariness, illness etc. strong furniture; a strong castle; a strong wind; She's a strong swimmer; He has a very strong will/personality; He has never been very strong (= healthy); He is not strong enough to lift that heavy table.
2. very noticeable; very intense. a strong colour; a strong smell.
3. containing a large amount of the flavouring ingredient. strong tea.
4. (of a group, force etc) numbering a particular amount. An army 20,000 strong was advancing towards the town.
ˈstrongly adverb
strength (streŋθ) noun
1. the quality of being strong. He got his strength back slowly after his illness; I hadn't the strength to resist him.
2. the number of people etc in a force, organization etc, considered as an indication of its power or effectiveness. The force is below strength.
strengthen (ˈstreŋθən) verb
to make or become strong or stronger. He did exercises to strengthen his muscles; The wind strengthened.
ˈstrongbox noun
a safe or box for valuables.
strong drink
alcoholic liquors.
ˈstronghold noun
a fort, fortress or castle etc.
strong language
swearing or abuse.
ˌstrong-ˈminded adjective
having determination.
strong point
a quality, skill etc in which a person excels. Arithmetic isn't one of my strong points.
strongroom noun
a room specially constructed for keeping valuable articles, with thick walls and a heavy steel door etc.
on the strength of
relying on. On the strength of this offer of money, we plan to start building soon.
References in classic literature ?
"Oh, indeed!" said Miss Blish, rather blankly, for French was not her strong point by any means.
I said I could not deny that this was a strong point. I said it
That's Ponta's strong point. He's a wild man, with an kinds of punches,--a whirlwind,-- and he gets his man in the first rounds.
Idling always has been my strong point. I take no credit to myself in the matter--it is a gift.
When most of the Subalterns sat upon him with sofa-cushions to find out why he had not said that acting was his strong point, he answered very quietly:--"I don't think you ever asked me.
Porthos didn't understand any too clearly; but then we know that understanding was not his strong point. "You say, then," he continued, "that the Count de Rochefort spoke of me to the cardinal?"
"No; though perhaps wisdom is not his strong point, but rather affection and sincerity.
Here the author describes minutely everything belonging to Don Diego's mansion, putting before us in his picture the whole contents of a rich gentleman-farmer's house; but the translator of the history thought it best to pass over these and other details of the same sort in silence, as they are not in harmony with the main purpose of the story, the strong point of which is truth rather than dull digressions.
Argument was not his strong point, but holding fast to his opinion certainly was.
Jo's one strong point was the fruit, for she had sugared it well, and had a pitcher of rich cream to eat with it.
Wilfred Bohun did not smile, for humour was never his strong point. But he nodded rather eagerly, being only too ready to explain the Gothic splendours to someone more likely to be sympathetic than the Presbyterian blacksmith or the atheist cobbler.
I had, however, one rather strong point. I possessed the gift of dismissing unpleasant considerations, not intimately connected with the passing moment, entirely from my mind.