strooke

strooke

(struːk)
n
obsolete a stroke
References in periodicals archive ?
By this it strooke eleven Home then he comes to dinner, by the way He chanced to meet a gentleman of the court [...] I watcht at his doore til he had din'd, Followed him to Lion key, saw him take a boate, And in a pair of Oares, as soone as he Landed at Greenwitch, where ever since, I trac'd him too and fro.
Malfi (1623), "strooke and banded / Which way please them" (v.
Inflamed with wrath, his raging blade he heft, And strooke so strongly, that the knotty string Of his huge taile he quite a sunder cleft, Five joynts thereof he hewd, and but the stump him left.
Pollente's villein, "with scull all raw," rushes out to collect the levy, "To whom [Artegall] aunswerd wroth, loe there thy hire; / And with that word him strooke, that streight he did expire" (5.2.11.8-9).
Through sweet sounds and odours men 'receiue theyr second birth' (stanza 36), and upon seeing her 'hee (strooke dead) was meere heaven-borne become' (stanza 57).Her odours came to Ovid's sense
Cursed be hee that strooke his holinesse a blowe on the face.
Princes, at a shoote, / So bloodily hast strooke" (267), by the
"On Monday the 19th of this January Julio my sonne appointed about 6 of the clock att night to visitt a freind, and meetinge Mr Gerbier in the Strande they fell into expostulations, and uppon some ill woordes given it is confessed that my unadvised sonne Julio strooke him once or twise with his swoorde in the Scaberd over the heade, and the Scaberd being broken John Bous, Mr Gerbier his man, layinge houlde on the swoorde to wrest it out of my sonnes hande, cutt his hand.
Forbeare darke night, my joyes now budd againe, Lately growne dead, while cold aspects, did chill The roote at heart, and my chiefe hope quite kill, And thunders strooke me in my pleasures waine.
This time structure is not readily apparent in the comprehensive time-span of the play, as the sequence of 14-hour intervals does not begin as the play opens, but with Romeo's entrance, when Benvolio says it is "new strooke nine" ([B.sup.r]; 1.1.161).
In John Webster's The Tragedy of the Duchess of Malfi, Bosola uses tennis to deliver the fatalistic message that "We are meerely the Starres tennis-balls (strooke, and banded which way please them)" (v.
The poet glosses the episode as much as possible, emphasizing that the sight of the "frantick British foes," the "fearlesse Druides," horrified the Roman commander Suetonius and "strooke him pale with dread," as their shrieking disturbed "the troubled heaven." As Hiller notes, Drayton's recasting of the scene does its best to turn the druids from victims into heroes.(31) But while Drayton wants to stress the druids' boldness, and not their annihilation, we sense that annihilation nevertheless.