strophe


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stro·phe

 (strō′fē)
n.
1.
a. The first of a pair of stanzas of alternating form on which the structure of a given poem is based.
b. A stanza containing irregular lines.
2. The first division of the triad constituting a section of a Pindaric ode.
3.
a. The first turning movement of the chorus from one side of the orchestra to the other in classical Greek drama.
b. The part of a choral ode sung while this movement is executed.

[Greek strophē, a turning, stanza, from strephein, to turn; see streb(h)- in Indo-European roots.]

strophe

(ˈstrəʊfɪ)
n
1. (Poetry) (in ancient Greek drama)
a. the first of two movements made by a chorus during the performance of a choral ode
b. the first part of a choral ode sung during this movement
2. (Poetry) (in classical verse) the first division of the threefold structure of a Pindaric ode
3. (Poetry) the first of two metrical systems used alternately within a poem
[C17: from Greek: a verse, literally: a turning, from strephein to twist]

stro•phe

(ˈstroʊ fi)

n., pl. -phes.
1.
a. the part of an ancient Greek choral ode sung by the chorus when moving from right to left.
b. the movement performed by the chorus while singing the strophe.
2. the first of the three series of lines forming the divisions of each section of a Pindaric ode.
3. (in modern poetry) any separate section or extended movement in a poem, distinguished from a stanza in that it does not follow a regularly repeated pattern.
[1595–1605; < Greek strophḗ turning, twist, strophe, n. derivative of stréphein to turn, twist]

strophe

that part of the ancient Greek choral odes sung by the chorus while moving from right to left. Cf. antistrophe. — strophic, adj.
See also: Drama
the first of two metrically related sections in a poem. Cf. antistrophe. See also drama.
See also: Verse

strophe

The first of a set of metrical systems (usually repeated) in a poem.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.strophe - one section of a lyric poem or choral ode in classical Greek drama
lyric poem, lyric - a short poem of songlike quality
stanza - a fixed number of lines of verse forming a unit of a poem
Translations

strophe

[ˈstrəʊfɪ] Nestrofa f

strophe

nStrophe f
References in classic literature ?
In each set of three the first stanza is called the strophe (turn), being intended, probably, for chanting as the chorus moved in one direction; the second stanza is called the antistrophe, chanted as the chorus executed a second, contrasting, movement; and the third stanza the epode, chanted as the chorus stood still.
He belonged to that race of martyrs who, indissolubly wedded to their political convictions as their ancestors were to their faith, are able to smile on pain: while being stretched on the rack, he recited with a firm voice, and scanning the lines according to measure, the first strophe of the "Justum ac tenacem" of Horace, and, making no confession, tired not only the strength, but even the fanaticism, of his executioners.
The canoes appeared very black on the white hiss of water; turbaned heads swayed back and forth; a multitude of arms in crimson and yellow rose and fell with one movement; the spearmen upright in the bows of canoes had variegated sarongs and gleaming shoulders like bronze statues; the muttered strophes of the paddlers' song ended periodically in a plaintive shout.
Tradition has preserved some wild strophes of the barbarous hymn which she chanted wildly amid that scene of fire and of slaughter:
The second strophe of Germanien describes the privation caused by the flight of the gods.
All sentences of a strophe begin with the same sign, the twenty-seven signs taken together form an acrostic which reveals the name of the poem's author.
Il reste tout de meme conciliant, ouvrant une fenetre d'espoir dans cette strophe dediee a la jeune generation.
the senses, soaking each strophe of the evening--this war-marrow, the
we must try to live" is the first line from the last strophe of the poem Le cimetiere marin (The Graveyard by the Sea, 1920/1922), one of the most important poems of the French literature and Paul Valery's most famous poetical work.
However, it is also strophic (a second strophe is given without music), and requires improvised rhythmic alterations in subsequent strophes to be typical of the French concentration on musical rhetoric.
Streaming" also makes use of refrains, which, when thinking of the collection as an epic, have the feel of strophe and antistrophe, especially when at the end of the poem they are combined into an epode.
CAT CA A TA T STROPHE (Channel 4, Monday, 10pm) A NEW sitcom this is co-written sitcom this is co-written by American comedian and bestselling author Rob Delaney - once dubbed the funniest man on Twitter - and awardwinning Irish actress Sharon Horgan, right.