structuralism

(redirected from structuralists)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

struc·tur·al·ism

 (strŭk′chər-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
A method of analyzing phenomena, as in anthropology, linguistics, psychology, or literature, chiefly characterized by contrasting the elemental components of the phenomena in a system of binary opposition and examining how the elemental components are combined to make larger units.

struc′tur·al·ist adj. & n.

structuralism

(ˈstrʌktʃərəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) an approach to anthropology and other social sciences and to literature that interprets and analyses its material in terms of oppositions, contrasts, and hierarchical structures, esp as they might reflect universal mental characteristics or organizing principles. Compare functionalism
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an approach to anthropology and other social sciences and to literature that interprets and analyses its material in terms of oppositions, contrasts, and hierarchical structures, esp as they might reflect universal mental characteristics or organizing principles. Compare functionalism
3. (Linguistics) an approach to linguistics that analyses and describes the structure of language, as distinguished from its comparative and historical aspects
ˈstructuralist n, adj

struc•tur•al•ism

(ˈstrʌk tʃər əˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. any study or theory that embodies structural principles.
4. a school of psychology that analyzes conscious mental activity by studying the hierarchical association of structures, or complex ideas, with simpler ideas, perceptions, and sensations.
[1945–50]
struc′tur•al•ist, n., adj.
struc`tur•al•is′tic, adj.

structuralism

an emphasis in research and description upon the systematic relations of formal distinctions in a given language. Also called structural linguistics. — structuralist, n.
See also: Linguistics
functionalism.
See also: Architecture

structuralism

1. An approach to the study of language that concentrates on its internal structure as opposed to the history of its development or its relationships with other languages.
2. A critical discipline which studies a text in relation to other known elements, including knowledge of the author, contemporaneous culture, literary convention, and facts not mentioned in the text but known to intended readers in addition to the text itself.
3. Structural anthropologists see cultural forms (e.g. customs, language, and tools used by man) as projections into this world of the inner workings of the human mind. The task of anthropology is to decode these cultural forms to reveal the principles through which the human mind operates.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.structuralism - linguistics defined as the analysis of formal structures in a text or discourse
linguistics - the scientific study of language
2.structuralism - an anthropological theory that there are unobservable social structures that generate observable social phenomena
theory - a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world; an organized system of accepted knowledge that applies in a variety of circumstances to explain a specific set of phenomena; "theories can incorporate facts and laws and tested hypotheses"; "true in fact and theory"
anthropology - the social science that studies the origins and social relationships of human beings
3.structuralism - a sociological theory based on the premise that society comes before individuals
theory - a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world; an organized system of accepted knowledge that applies in a variety of circumstances to explain a specific set of phenomena; "theories can incorporate facts and laws and tested hypotheses"; "true in fact and theory"
sociology - the study and classification of human societies
Translations
strukturalizmus

structuralism

[ˈstrʌktʃərəlɪzəm] Nestructuralismo m

structuralism

nder Strukturalismus

structuralism

[ˈstrʌktʃrəˌlɪzm] nstrutturalismo
References in periodicals archive ?
So far, economists - structuralists as well as diehard Keynesians - have been stumped.
With this view, the Structuralists have developed, i will argue, a corollary to the doctrine of the Mahayana philosopher Nagarjuna distinction between supreme truth and conventional truth, where the signified phenomenon is a manifestation of supreme truth and the signifier one of conventional truth.
The structuralists generally maintain that all elements of human experience, including language and literary expression, are reducible to a system of signs, and such signs are purely arbitrary in meaning.
The scholars designated as structuralists were expelled from their academic posts or left the country.
He bashes solipsistic phenomenologists and criticizes structuralists for domesticating human subjects to the tyranny of a system (p.
Lofts ignores that Cassirer is demonstrably much closer to interpreters of religious phenomena such as Schelling, Coleridge, Buber, Jung, and Eliade than to any structuralists, post-structuralists, semiologists, or hermeneuticists, and shoves him instead into a Lacanian/Procrustean bed.
Despite this disagreement, neoliberals and structuralists shared a crucial common ground.
According to structuralists, Julius Caesar can play the role of the number two, so long as Caesar has the appropriate relationships with other entities, and together they make up an [Omega]-sequence (with Caesar being the successor of the successor of the entity playing the zero role, of course).
He is clearly not himself a generativist, but in lumping together the generativists and the structuralists as theoreticians he is making another error.
Michel Foucault, Roman Jakobson, and Roland Barthes are among the more prominent structuralists.
But the scholarship of Kanter, MacKinnon, Schultz, and other structuralists also has an activist quality; it is designed to show that the status quo is not inevitable and to suggest what measures can be taken to bring about change.
Following Levi-Strauss, structuralists defined "structure" as a pair of polar opposite terms mediated by a third term.