strychnine


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Related to strychnine: arsenic, cyanide

strych·nine

 (strĭk′nīn′, -nĭn, -nēn′)
n.
An extremely poisonous white crystalline alkaloid, C21H22O2N2, derived from nux vomica and related plants, used as a poison for rodents and other pests and formerly as a stimulant.

[French, from New Latin Strychnos, genus name, from Latin strychnon, a kind of nightshade, from Greek strukhnon.]

strychnine

(ˈstrɪkniːn)
n
(Biochemistry) a white crystalline very poisonous alkaloid, obtained from the plant nux vomica: formerly used in small quantities as a stimulant of the central nervous system and the appetite. Formula: C21H22O2N2. Also called: strychnia
[C19: via French from New Latin Strychnos, from Greek strukhnos nightshade]

strych•nine

(ˈstrɪk nɪn, -nin, -naɪn)

n.
a colorless, crystalline poison, C21H22N2O2, obtained chiefly by extraction from the seeds of nux vomica, formerly used as a central nervous system stimulant.
[1810–20; < French, = New Latin Strychn(os) genus name (< Greek strýchnos black nightshade) + French -ine -ine2]
strych′nic, adj.

strych·nine

(strĭk′nīn′)
An extremely poisonous, white crystalline compound derived from certain plants. It is used as a rat poison and was formerly used in medicine to stimulate the nervous system.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.strychnine - an alkaloid plant toxin extracted chiefly from nux vomicastrychnine - an alkaloid plant toxin extracted chiefly from nux vomica; formerly used as a stimulant
nux vomica - a medicine made from the seeds of an Asiatic tree; contains strychnine and brucine; formerly used as a stimulant
alkaloid - natural bases containing nitrogen found in plants
phytotoxin, plant toxin - any substance produced by plants that is similar in its properties to extracellular bacterial toxin
Translations

strychnine

[ˈstrɪkniːn] Nestricnina f

strychnine

[ˈstrɪkniːn] nstrychnine f

strychnine

nStrychnin nt

strychnine

[ˈstrɪkniːn] nstricnina

strych·nine

n. estricnina, alcaloide cristalino muy venenoso.

strychnine

n estricnina
References in classic literature ?
We have with great success made a practice of not leaving arsenic and strychnine, and typhoid and tuberculosis germs lying around for our children to be destroyed by.
I spent it in ransacking the library until I discovered a medical book which gave a description of strychnine poisoning.
But I bided my time, and one day, when opportunity was ripe, lured the animal away and settled for him with strychnine and beefsteak.
Only don't say I didn't warn you if he burns Green Gables down or puts strychnine in the well--I heard of a case over in New Brunswick where an orphan asylum child did that and the whole family died in fearful agonies.
Holmes declares that he overheard me caution him against the great danger of taking more than two drops of castor oil, while I recommended strychnine in large doses as a sedative.
We know a man who took a spoonful of strychnine in a bath, and he never was the same afterwards.
Questions of medical jurisprudence ought not to be left to the chance of decent knowledge in a medical witness, and the coroner ought not to be a man who will believe that strychnine will destroy the coats of the stomach if an ignorant practitioner happens to tell him so.
Instead of having watered his cabbage with arsenic, he had watered it this time with a solution of salts, having their basis in strychnine, strychnos colubrina, as the learned term it.
Controversy resulted from Thomson's advocacy of lobelia, also known as Indian tobacco or puke week at a time when the orthodox medical community was regularly administering mercury, arsenic, strychnine, opium, and other poisonous materials.
However, on August 18, Artykov was stripped of a bronze medal as his doping test came positive for strychnine, which is on the World Anti-Doping Agency's list of banned substances.
She attempted to dispose of the package but was later hospitalized after allegedly being poisoned with Strychnine, a deadly poison used by authorities to kill stray animals in Egypt.
One particularly productive murderess lopped off an entire branch of her family tree with strychnine because, according to family tradition, she liked to don her black taffeta dress at funerals.