stumping


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stump

 (stŭmp)
n.
1. The part of a tree trunk left protruding from the ground after the tree has fallen or has been felled.
2. A part, as of a branch, limb, or tooth, remaining after the main part has been cut away, broken off, or worn down.
3.
a. stumps Informal The legs.
b. An artificial leg.
4. Derogatory A short, thickset person.
5. A heavy footfall.
6. A place or an occasion used for political or campaign oratory: candidates out on the stump.
7. A short, pointed roll of leather or paper or wad of rubber for rubbing on a charcoal or pencil drawing to shade or soften it.
8. Sports Any of the three upright sticks in a cricket wicket.
v. stumped, stump·ing, stumps
v.tr.
1. To reduce to a stump.
2. To clear stumps from: stump a field.
3. To stub (a toe or foot).
4. To walk over heavily or clumsily.
5. To traverse (a district or region) making political speeches.
6. To shade (a drawing) with a stump.
7. To challenge (someone); dare.
8. To cause to be at a loss; baffle: stumped the teacher with a question.
v.intr.
1. To walk heavily or clumsily.
2. To go about making political speeches.

[Middle English stumpe, possibly from Middle Low German stump.]

stump′er n.
stump′i·ness n.
stump′y adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stumping - campaigning for something by making political speeches (stump speeches)
campaigning, candidacy, candidature, electioneering, political campaign - the campaign of a candidate to be elected
References in classic literature ?
'If I get on with him as I expect to get on,' Silas pursues, stumping and meditating, 'it wouldn't become me to leave it here.
Stumping with fresh vigour, he goes in at the dark greasy entry, pushes a little greasy dark reluctant side-door, and follows the door into the little dark greasy shop.
A red-faced man, slamming the cabin door behind him and stumping out on the deck, interrupted my reflections, though I made a mental note of the topic for use in a projected essay which I had thought of calling "The Necessity for Freedom: A Plea for the Artist." The red-faced man shot a glance up at the pilot-house, gazed around at the fog, stumped across the deck and back (he evidently had artificial legs), and stood still by my side, legs wide apart, and with an expression of keen enjoyment on his face.