stupor


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to stupor: Catatonic stupor

stu·por

 (sto͞o′pər, styo͞o′-)
n.
A state of reduced sensibility or consciousness: staggered around in a drunken stupor.

[Middle English, from Latin, from stupēre, to be stunned.]

stu′por·ous adj.

stupor

(ˈstjuːpə)
n
1. (Pathology) a state of unconsciousness
2. mental dullness; torpor
[C17: from Latin, from stupēre to be aghast]
ˈstuporous adj

stu•por

(ˈstu pər, ˈstyu-)

n.
1. suspension or great diminution of sensibility, as in disease or as caused by narcotics, intoxicants, etc.: a drunken stupor.
2. mental torpor; apathy; stupefaction.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin: astonishment, insensibility =stup(ēre) to be numb or stunned + -or -or1]
stu′por•ous, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stupor - the feeling of distress and disbelief that you have when something bad happens accidentallystupor - the feeling of distress and disbelief that you have when something bad happens accidentally; "his mother's death left him in a daze"; "he was numb with shock"
stupefaction - a feeling of stupefied astonishment
2.stupor - marginal consciousness; "his grogginess was caused as much by exhaustion as by the blows"; "someone stole his wallet while he was in a drunken stupor"
unconsciousness - a state lacking normal awareness of the self or environment

stupor

noun daze, numbness, unconsciousness, trance, coma, inertia, lethargy, torpor, stupefaction, insensibility He was drinking himself into a stupor every night.

stupor

noun
Translations
خَبَل، غُيْبوبَه، خَدَر
otupěníztuhnutí
døs
sljóleiki; hálfmeîvitundarleysi
nustėrimas
apstulbumsstupors
omámenosť
sersemlemesersemlik

stupor

[ˈstjuːpəʳ] Nestupor m

stupor

[ˈstjuːpər] nstupeur f
in a stupor → frappé(e) de stupeur

stupor

nBenommenheit f; he lay/sat there in a stuporer lag/saß benommen or apathisch or teilnahmslos da; to be in a drunken stuporsinnlos betrunken or im Vollrausch sein

stupor

[ˈstjuːpəʳ] n (from heat, alcohol) → intontimento, stordimento

stupor

(ˈstjuːpə) noun
a half-conscious, dazed or bewildered condition caused by eg alcohol, drugs, shock etc. He was in a drunken stupor.

stu·por

n. estupor, letargo.

stupor

n estupor m
References in classic literature ?
She seemed, having shaken off the stupor of intoxication, to be striving to escape from her executioner.
On the balloon taking ground, Kennedy and Joe awoke from their stupor.
First he cast upon the dogs which were guarding them a stupor and strangles, so that the dogs forgot the cows and lost the power of barking.
The huge height of the buildings, running up to ten and fifteen storeys, the narrow arched entries that continually vomited passengers, the wares of the merchants in their windows, the hubbub and endless stir, the foul smells and the fine clothes, and a hundred other particulars too small to mention, struck me into a kind of stupor of surprise, so that I let the crowd carry me to and fro; and yet all the time what I was thinking of was Alan at Rest-and-be-Thankful; and all the time (although you would think I would not choose but be delighted with these braws and novelties) there was a cold gnawing in my inside like a remorse for something wrong.
And there they would eat what they had to eat, and afterward, because there was only their misery to talk of, they would crawl into bed and fall into a stupor and never stir until it was time to get up again, and dress by candlelight, and go back to the machines.
She stayed alone in a kind of reverie--a sort of stupor.
Presently they awoke from the stupor which already was beginning to overcome them, and crept out, shivering with cold and wrapped from head to foot in blankets.
Gradually weariness grew upon me; a numbness, an occasional stupor, fell upon my mind even in the midst of my terrors, until sleep at last supervened and in my sea-tossed coracle I lay and dreamed of home and the old Admiral Benbow.
So she bled him, and he fell into a stupor which lasted nearly all that day, so that he awoke weak and exhausted from loss of blood.
In a kind of stupor I watched all hands take to the rigging, and slowly but surely she came round to the wind; the sails fluttered, and then bellied out as the wind came into them.
murmured the Comte de la Fere, at witnessing with stupor this monstrous alliance of words; -- "friends
As she drove on through Blackmoor Vale, and the landscape of her youth began to open around her, Tess aroused herself from her stupor.