sturgeon


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stur·geon

 (stûr′jən)
n.
Any of various large freshwater and marine fishes of the family Acipenseridae of the Northern Hemisphere, having ganoid scales and edible flesh and valued for their roe, which is used for caviar, and their swim bladders, which are used to make isinglass.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, from Old French estourgeon, of Germanic origin.]

sturgeon

(ˈstɜːdʒən)
n
(Animals) any primitive bony fish of the family Acipenseridae, of temperate waters of the N hemisphere, having an elongated snout and rows of spines along the body: valued as a source of caviar and isinglass
[C13: from Old French estourgeon, of Germanic origin; related to Old English styria, Old High German sturio]

stur•geon

(ˈstɜr dʒən)

n., pl. (esp. collectively) -geon, (esp. for kinds or species) -geons.
any of the large fresh- and saltwater ganoid fishes of the family Acipenseridae, valued for their flesh and as a source of caviar and isinglass.
[1250–1300; < Old French esturgeon < Germanic]

stur·geon

(stûr′jən)
Any of various large, primitive freshwater or saltwater fish having bony plates rather than true scales on its body. It is widely used for food, and its roe is a source of caviar.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sturgeon - large primitive fishes valued for their flesh and roesturgeon - large primitive fishes valued for their flesh and roe; widely distributed in the North Temperate Zone
ganoid, ganoid fish - primitive fishes having thick bony scales with a shiny covering
Acipenser transmontanus, Pacific sturgeon, Sacramento sturgeon, white sturgeon - food and game fish of marine and fresh waters of northwestern coast of North America
Acipenser huso, beluga, hausen, white sturgeon - valuable source of caviar and isinglass; found in Black and Caspian seas
Translations
سَمَك الحَفَش يُؤْخَذ منه الكافيار
jeseter
stør
sampi
jesetra
styrja
eršketas
store
jesiotr
jeseter
stör
mersin balığı

sturgeon

[ˈstɜːdʒən] Nesturión m

sturgeon

[ˈstɜːrən] nesturgeon m

sturgeon

nStör m

sturgeon

[ˈstɜːdʒn] nstorione m

sturgeon

(ˈstəːdʒən) plurals ˈsturgeon ~ˈsturgeons noun
a type of large fish from which caviare is obtained.
References in classic literature ?
I've come down to fish sturgeon a couple of months," he said to Carmintel.
Pricked by the first hook it touches, the sturgeon gives a startled leap and comes into contact with half a dozen more hooks.
The bight we knew to be good ground for sturgeon, and there we felt sure the King of the Greeks intended to begin operations.
We could see him quite plainly, gaffing the sturgeon and throwing them into the boat while his companion ran the line and cleared the hooks as he dropped them back into the water.
Together we hove up the rope till the anchor I came in sight with the sturgeon line caught across one of the flukes.
The speck of a boat grew larger and larger, till we could see Big Alec and his partner, with a turn of the sturgeon line around a cleat, resting from their labor to laugh at us.
He hauled in forty or fifty feet with a young sturgeon still fast in a tangle of barbless hooks, slashed that much of the line free with his knife, and tossed it into the cockpit beside the prisoners.
I know not that any other author has hinted of the matter; but by inference it seems to me that the sturgeon must be divided in the same way as the whale, the King receiving the highly dense and elastic head peculiar to that fish, which, symbolically regarded, may possibly be humorously grounded upon some presumed congeniality.
Early in August, a wandering band of savages from the Strait of Juan de Fuca made their appearance at the mouth of the Columbia, where they came to fish for sturgeon.
The dimensions of the dishes served were made to correspond with the importance of the personage entertained, and the boiled sturgeon that figured at this magnificent repast was not an inch shorter than Dr.
The old prince sat in silence, his bright little eyes watching Karenin from one side, and Stepan Arkadyevitch saw that he had already formed a phrase to sum up that politician of whom guests were invited to partake as though he were a sturgeon.
They do not often see Rhine carp or Channel sturgeon.