stutter

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stutter

speak in such a way that the rhythm is interrupted by repetition, blocks, or spasms, or prolongations of sounds and syllables along with contortions of the face and body; distorted speech [Both stammer and stutter mean to speak with difficulty. Stammer suggests inarticulate sounds or interrupted speech caused by excitement, embarrassment, confusion, or other emotion that may require special treatment to correct. Stutter designates a broad range of speech defects. It is the term that is preferred in technical usage: His stutter was more than merely a stammer of embarrassment.]
Not to be confused with:
stammer – speak with involuntary breaks and pauses or with spasmodic repetitions of syllables or sounds; pause, hesitate, falter

stut·ter

 (stŭt′ər)
intr. & tr.v. stut·tered, stut·ter·ing, stut·ters
To speak or utter with a spasmodic repetition or prolongation of sounds.
n.
The act or habit of stuttering.

[Frequentative of dialectal stut, from Middle English stutten.]

stut′ter·er n.
stut′ter·ing·ly adv.

stutter

(ˈstʌtə)
vb
1. to speak (a word, phrase, etc) with recurring repetition of consonants, esp initial ones
2. to make (an abrupt sound) repeatedly: the gun stuttered.
n
3. the act or habit of stuttering
4. a stuttering sound
[C16: related to Middle Low German stötern, Old High German stōzan to push against, Latin tundere to beat]
ˈstutterer n
ˈstuttering n, adj
ˈstutteringly adv

stut•ter

(ˈstʌt ər)

v.i.
1. to speak with the rhythm interrupted by repetitions, blocks or spasms, or prolongations of sounds or syllables.
2. to proceed or operate with spasmodic interruptions or repetitions.
v.t.
3. to say with a stutter.
n.
4. an act or instance of stuttering.
5. speech characterized by blocks or spasms interrupting the rhythm.
[1520–30; earlier stut (Middle English stutten to stutter) + -er6; compare Dutch stotteren, Middle Low German stotern in same sense]
stut′ter•er, n.

stutter


Past participle: stuttered
Gerund: stuttering

Imperative
stutter
stutter
Present
I stutter
you stutter
he/she/it stutters
we stutter
you stutter
they stutter
Preterite
I stuttered
you stuttered
he/she/it stuttered
we stuttered
you stuttered
they stuttered
Present Continuous
I am stuttering
you are stuttering
he/she/it is stuttering
we are stuttering
you are stuttering
they are stuttering
Present Perfect
I have stuttered
you have stuttered
he/she/it has stuttered
we have stuttered
you have stuttered
they have stuttered
Past Continuous
I was stuttering
you were stuttering
he/she/it was stuttering
we were stuttering
you were stuttering
they were stuttering
Past Perfect
I had stuttered
you had stuttered
he/she/it had stuttered
we had stuttered
you had stuttered
they had stuttered
Future
I will stutter
you will stutter
he/she/it will stutter
we will stutter
you will stutter
they will stutter
Future Perfect
I will have stuttered
you will have stuttered
he/she/it will have stuttered
we will have stuttered
you will have stuttered
they will have stuttered
Future Continuous
I will be stuttering
you will be stuttering
he/she/it will be stuttering
we will be stuttering
you will be stuttering
they will be stuttering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been stuttering
you have been stuttering
he/she/it has been stuttering
we have been stuttering
you have been stuttering
they have been stuttering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been stuttering
you will have been stuttering
he/she/it will have been stuttering
we will have been stuttering
you will have been stuttering
they will have been stuttering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been stuttering
you had been stuttering
he/she/it had been stuttering
we had been stuttering
you had been stuttering
they had been stuttering
Conditional
I would stutter
you would stutter
he/she/it would stutter
we would stutter
you would stutter
they would stutter
Past Conditional
I would have stuttered
you would have stuttered
he/she/it would have stuttered
we would have stuttered
you would have stuttered
they would have stuttered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stutter - a speech disorder involving hesitations and involuntary repetitions of certain sounds
defect of speech, speech defect, speech disorder - a disorder of oral speech
Verb1.stutter - speak haltingly; "The speaker faltered when he saw his opponent enter the room"
mouth, speak, talk, verbalise, verbalize, utter - express in speech; "She talks a lot of nonsense"; "This depressed patient does not verbalize"

stutter

noun
1. stammer, faltering, speech impediment, speech defect, hesitance He spoke with a pronounced stutter.
verb
1. stammer, stumble, falter, hesitate, splutter, speak haltingly I was trembling so hard, I though I would stutter when I spoke.

stutter

verb
To introduce involuntary repetitions and pauses into one's speech:
noun
A speech impediment marked by involuntary repetitions and pauses:
Translations
تأتَأَه في الكلاميُتأتِئ في الكلاميَتَلَعْثَمُ
koktatkoktavost
stammetalefejl
änkyttääänkytys
גמגוםלגמגם
mucati
stamstama
どもる
말을 더듬다
mikčius
stostīšanāsstostīties
koktavosť
jecljanjejecljati
stamma
ติดอ่าง
kekelemekkekemelik
nói lắp

stutter

[ˈstʌtəʳ]
A. Ntartamudeo m
he has a bad stuttertartamudea terriblemente
to say sth with a stutterdecir algo tartamudeando
B. VItartamudear
C. VT (also stutter out) → decir tartamudeando

stutter

[ˈstʌtər]
nbégaiement m
to have a stutter → bégayer
He's got a stutter → Il bégaie.
vibégayer
vtbégayer

stutter

n (of person, engine)Stottern nt no pl; (of guns)Trommeln nt; he has a bad stutterer stottert sehr; to say something with a stutteretw stotternd sagen, etw stottern
vi
stottern; he was stuttering with embarrassmenter stotterte vor Verlegenheit; she stuttered out an apologysie entschuldigte sich stotternd
(= advance slowly) to stutter on/alongentlangstottern; (fig, reform) → sich dahinquälen
vtstottern; she stuttered an apologysie entschuldigte sich stotternd

stutter

[ˈstʌtəʳ]
1. nbalbuzie f
he has a bad stutter → ha una balbuzie pronunciata
2. vi & vtbalbettare

stutter

(ˈstatə) verb
to stammer. He stutters sometimes when he's excited; `I've s-s-seen a gh-gh-ghost,' he stuttered.
noun
a stammer. He has a stutter.
ˈstutterer noun
a person who has a stammer.

stutter

يَتَلَعْثَمُ koktat stamme stottern κεκεδίζω balbucear änkyttää bégayer mucati balbettare どもる 말을 더듬다 stotteren stamme jąkać się gaguejar заикаться stamma ติดอ่าง kekelemek nói lắp 口吃着说

stut·ter

vi. tartamudear.

stutter

vi tartamudear
References in classic literature ?
All hunchbacks walk with their heads held high, all stutterers harangue, all deaf people speak low.
And this stutterer, won't he turn out a murderer?" she cried, pointing to Burdovsky, who was staring at her with stupefaction.
Nowadays stutterers get therapy to stutter more comfortably, not to obliterate their stutter.
'I applied for 'Ireland's Got Talent' mainly because I want to inspire other people, especially all the stutterers around the world since I'm also a stutterer myself,' he said in an interview backstage.
"The three points achieved here against a sweat-soaked and stubborn, if woefully limited, Cardiff City took Marco Silva's side into sixth place, ahead of the perpetual stutterers Manchester United.
By HENRYK ZIENTEK henryk.zientek@trinitymirror.com @HenrykZientek A FORMER student at the University of Huddersfield who has learned how to control his stammer is helping fellow stutterers to find their words.
Paskievich's films (many of which were made for the National Film Board of Canada), follow the lives of different outsiders, from Slovakian Roma to stutterers.
A systematic review of researches related to the effects of altering auditory feedback on speech fluency in stutterers concluded that the exclusive use of delayed auditory feedback does not provide conclusive results (31).
This lead her to found "Stutter UAE," a support group first of its kind in the country that provides a platform to the community of stutterers to meet and raise awareness in the society about the issue.
The strutters who had become stutterers had reverted to nature and condemned a chasing Huddersfield to the uncertainty of the play-offs.
The comparison of prosodic patterns of stutterers and nonstutterers disfluencies was done in [13], where authors analysed spontaneous storytelling of 8 people: four stutterers and four nonstutterers.
The data presented in this qualitative study are important insofar as they provide a window to understanding stutterers' experiences in school.