styloid

(redirected from styloids)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.

sty·loid

 (stī′loid′)
adj.
1. Resembling a style in shape; slender and pointed: the styloid muscles in carnivores.
2. Anatomy Of, relating to, or designating any of several slender, pointed bone processes, especially the spine that projects from the base of the temporal bone.
n.
A long solitary crystal of calcium oxalate occurring in the cells of certain plants.

styloid

(ˈstaɪlɔɪd)
adj
1. resembling a stylus
2. anatomy of or relating to a projecting process of the temporal bone
[C18: from New Latin styloides, from Greek stuloeidēs like a stylus; influenced also by Greek stulos pillar]

sty•loid

(ˈstaɪ lɔɪd)

adj.
1. Bot. resembling a style; slender and pointed.
2. of or designating a long, spinelike process of a bone, esp. that projecting from the temporal bone.
[1605–15; < New Latin styloīdēs. See style, -oid]
Translations

sty·loid

a. estiloide, de forma larga y puntiaguda.
References in periodicals archive ?
Solitary crystals which are very variable in size and shape (styloids) are characteristically observed and frequently form a sheath along the outer boundary of the pericyclic sclerenchyma (Figure 1).
As in the two other species, solitary crystals with various shapes and sizes (styloids) are observed and frequently form a sheath along the outer boundary of the pericyclic sclerenchyma (Figure 3).
Calcium oxalate crystals (COC) are a common trait of Euphorbiaceae and can be found as styloids that tear the epidermis giving the dehydrated leaf blade a rough surface, as in the genus Claoxylon and Micrococca (Kabouw et al, 2008), as polygonal crystals within the mesophyll (Levin, 1986) or as druses in the palisade parenchyma, mesophyll and veins (Levin, 1986; Hussin et al., 1996; Murillo, 2002; Kabouw et al., 2008).
Dorsal approach (Fig.3): After painting and draping, an 8cm longitudinal incision was made on the dorsum of the wrist, crossing the wrist along the midpoint of radial and ulnar styloids. The incision begins 3cm proximal to wrist joint and ends about 5cm distal to it.
CTA demonstrated complete left internal carotid occlusion at the level of the styloid tip, 1-cm cranial to the bifurcation, which extended to the carotid terminus (figure 1).
(1.) Monsour PA, Young WG .Variability of the styloid process and stylohyoid ligament in panoramic radiographs.