subaltern


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sub·al·tern

 (sŭb-ôl′tərn, sŭb′əl-tûrn′)
n.
1. A person who is lower in position or rank; a subordinate.
2.
a. A person who is marginalized and oppressed by the dominant culture, especially in a colonial context.
b. Such people considered as a group.
3. Chiefly British An officer holding a military rank just below that of captain.
4. Logic A particular proposition that follows from a universal with the same subject, predicate, and quality.

[French subalterne, from Old French, from Late Latin subalternus : Latin sub-, sub- + Latin alternus, alternate (from alter, other; see al- in Indo-European roots).]

sub·al′tern adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

subaltern

(ˈsʌbəltən)
n
1. (Military) a commissioned officer below the rank of captain in certain armies, esp the British
2. a person of inferior rank or position
3. (Logic) logic
a. the relation of one proposition to another when the first is implied by the second, esp the relation of a particular to a universal proposition
b. (as modifier): a subaltern relation.
adj
of inferior position or rank
[C16: from Late Latin subalternus, from Latin sub- + alternus alternate, from alter the other]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sub•al•tern

(sʌbˈɔl tərn or, esp. for 3,6, ˈsʌb əlˌtɜrn)
n.
1. a person who has a subordinate position.
2. a commissioned officer in the British army below the rank of captain.
3. Logic. a particular proposition inferred from a corresponding universal proposition.
adj.
4. lower in rank; subordinate.
[1575–85; < Late Latin subalternus= Latin sub- sub- + alternus alternate]
sub`al•ter′ni•ty, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subaltern - a British commissioned army officer below the rank of captain
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
commissioned military officer - a commissioned officer in the Army or Air Force or Marine Corps
Adj.1.subaltern - inferior in rank or status; "the junior faculty"; "a lowly corporal"; "petty officialdom"; "a subordinate functionary"
junior - younger; lower in rank; shorter in length of tenure or service
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

subaltern

adjective
Below another in standing or importance:
Informal: smalltime.
noun
One belonging to a lower class or rank:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
ذو مَرْكِز أو رُتْبَه ثانويَّه
nižší důstojník
undirforingi
jaunesnysis karininkas
jaunākais virsnieks
nižší dôstojník
ast rütbeli subay

subaltern

[ˈsʌbltən] N (Brit) (Mil) → alférez mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

subaltern

n (Brit, Mil) → Subalternoffizier(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

subaltern

[ˈsʌbltn] n (Mil) → subalterno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

subaltern

(ˈsabltən) , ((American) səˈbo:ltərn) noun
an officer in the army under the rank of captain.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The safest plan is never to tread on a worm--not even on the last new subaltern from Home, with his buttons hardly out of their tissue paper, and the red of sappy English beef in his cheeks.
Allowing for duty-men and sick, the Regiment was one thousand and eighty strong, and Bobby belonged to them; for was he not a Subaltern of the Line, - the whole Line and nothing but the Line, - as the tramp of two thousand one hundred and sixty sturdy ammunition boots attested?
She had jilted them all - from Basset-Holmer the senior captain to little Mildred the junior subaltern, who could have given her four thousand a year and a title.
My father knew a subaltern officer of that name when he was with his regiment in Canada.
"The object of never deceiving oneself, monseigneur; nor being wanting in the respect which a subaltern owes to his superior officers, nor infringing the duties of a service one has accepted of one's own free will."
"Well, he's really a good fellow, one can serve under him," said Timokhin to the subaltern beside him.
I told him, "that in the kingdom of Tribnia, (3) by the natives called Langdon, (4) where I had sojourned some time in my travels, the bulk of the people consist in a manner wholly of discoverers, witnesses, informers, accusers, prosecutors, evidences, swearers, together with their several subservient and subaltern instruments, all under the colours, the conduct, and the pay of ministers of state, and their deputies.
It is a painful thought to me to-night, that he could wake up glorious once, this man in the elbow-chair by the fire, who is humorously known at the club as a "confirmed spinster." I remember him well when his years told four and twenty; on my soul the proudest subaltern of my acquaintance, and with the most reason to be proud.
I think I was a good, prompt subaltern, and I am very sure that Hands was an excellent pilot, for we went about and about and dodged in, shaving the banks, with a certainty and a neatness that were a pleasure to behold.
Although I am only a tutor--a kind of subaltern, Mr.
Even the very place of his captivity was uncertain, and his fate but very imperfectly known to the generality of his subjects, who were, in the meantime, a prey to every species of subaltern oppression.
She was an extraordinarily beautiful girl, Margaret Devereux, and made all the men frantic by running away with a penniless young fellow-- a mere nobody, sir, a subaltern in a foot regiment, or something of that kind.