subalternity

subalternity

(ˌsʌbɔːlˈtɜːnɪtɪ)
n
the quality or state of being in a subordinate position
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References in periodicals archive ?
(30) Stephen Morton, Gayatri Spivak: Ethics, Subalternity, and the Critique of Postcolonial Reason (Malden, Mass.: Polity, 2007) 73.
(30) Subalternity and Representation: Arguments in Cultural Theory (Durham, NC, and London: Duke University Press, 1999), p.
(22) Distinguishing testimonio from related genres such as autobiography and life-writing through its political urgency and desire to communicate 'a problem of repression, poverty, subalternity, imprisonment, struggle for survival, and so on', Beverley argues that what matters the most in testimonio is its capacity of address: When we are addressed in this way, directly, as it were, even by someone who we would normally disregard, we are placed under an obligation to respond; we may act or not on that obligation, we may resent or welcome it, but we cannot ignore it.
Poems such as "My Graduation Speech" by Laviera and "Puerto Rican Obituary" by Pietri highlight subalternity as a point of departure for a radicalized discourse.
Wing Chung Ho, "Negotiating Subalternity in a Former Socialist 'Model Community' in Shanghai: From 'Model Proletarians' to 'Society People,' The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology, 6:2 (2005), 159-180.
Despite his subalternity, however, the boy bests Castorp by his language competence, the lack of which the latter painfully realizes in their conversation.
"Subalternity and International Law: The Problems of Global Community the Incomensurability of Difference." In Eve Darian-Smith and Peter Fitzpatrick, eds., Laws of the Postcolonial (pp.
For Boland, restriction in the poet's experience of their subject enters into relationship with the character of constraint or subalternity in that material itself, to produce rather than exclude the poet's potential for vision of that experience.
The epistemological subalternity of the socio-political context that is East Timor, on the one hand, and its women, on the other, re-enforces a cognitive movement that can work to resist the 'wasting of experience' and challenge metonymic reason and its 'limited understanding of itself and the world'.
Because she was not only Other but female Other, the weight of subalternity she shouldered was double.