subcaliber


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sub·cal·i·ber

 (sŭb-kăl′ə-bər)
adj.
1. Smaller in caliber than the barrel of the gun from which it was fired. Used of projectiles.
2. Relating to or firing such projectiles.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Shotshell Types There are three distinct types of shotgun loads: Pellets, or shot; slugs, i.e., a full-bore projectile; and sabot rounds, i.e., a subcaliber projectile often with a plastic sabot.
military adopted the AR-15 and its revolutionary subcaliber cartridge in the early 1960s, the then-proposed new round had to survive several attempts to kill it as stubborn military factions demanded evermore stringent downrange performance.
For training purposes and effective skill building opportunities, the M72 Subcaliber Rocket Trainer is available.
From what I can gather, the subcaliber actually hit the radar screen way back in the 1920s.
Don't neglect "subcaliber understudy guns." These are guns the same size and general configuration as the "serious gun," but dedicated to the .22 Long Rifle chambering.
Current SLM training consists of a block of instruction for M136 AT4 training and AT4 qualification with a 9mm subcaliber training launcher.
(cops prefer anonymity) were flailing subcaliber Eurotrash when I arrived on a clear, cool, windy morning.
Borescope the M225 cannon tube every 100 rounds when firing subcaliber training rounds.
A sabot is a lightweight carrier in which a subcaliber projectile is centered to permit firing the projectile in the larger caliber weapon.
Equally clever was the 4mm subcaliber kits that allowed indoor target practice.