subceiling

subceiling

(ˈsʌbˌsiːlɪŋ)
n
a ceiling placed on a subdivision of a category; a sublimit
References in periodicals archive ?
The Soviet Union, however--with two military districts in the north and two in the south that were located in the flanks--was the only state restricted by the flank subceiling as to where it could deploy forces on its own territory.
The Flanks (Again) The Adaptation Agreement adopted the 1996 geographic and numerical flank revisions for Russia and Ukraine, and even increased the Russian ACV subceiling.
Discord Over the Flanks More noteworthy, the review conference addressed CFE's biggest challenge to date: Russia's failure to comply with treaty subceilings imposed to prevent dangerous concentrations of TLE in the so-called northern and southern "flank" zones of the area of application.
Ceilings and Subceilings At the heart of the adapted treaty are national ceilings on all five CFE weapons categories, including subceilings on heavier armored combat vehicles (ACVs) and subceilings on the number of ground TLE (tanks, artillery, ACVs) that could be held in active units (the remainder to be kept in designated storage depots).
A state could also increase its headroom for accommodating stationed forces by lowering its national ceiling, but any changes to ceilings or subceilings required advance notification and could incur political costs.
Agreements with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) put a ceiling on Indonesia's external borrowing and a specific subceiling on Pertamina's.
Bogged down in minutiae such as the "ceiling of 2,400 aggregate strategic nuclear launch vehicles and a subceiling of 1,200 intercontinental ballistic missiles," he lets Schlafly and grass-roots conservatism recede from view, as if he's lost interest.
The Vladivostock Accords outlined a treaty that would place an overall ceiling of 2,400 on offensive strategic missiles and a subceiling of 1,300 for systems capable of launching multiple warheads (multiple independently targeted reentry vehicles or MIRVs).
In January 1976, Kissinger had negotiated a compromise agreement whereby the United States would count cruise missile carrying bombers toward the 1,320 MIRV subceiling in return for limits on the number of Soviet backfire bombers.